Hundreds learn hands-on CPR at Save-a-Life Saturday

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Mel Reece and his wife Helen (right) practice hands-only CPR on a toy truck during during Save-a-Life Saturday at the Lynnwood Convention Center (Photos by David Pan)
Mel Reece and his wife Helen (right) of Mountlake Terrace practice hands-only CPR on a toy truck during during Save-a-Life Saturday at the Lynnwood Convention Center (Photos by David Pan)

Hundreds of people attended Save-a-Life Saturday, Snohomish County’s largest CPR training event, Saturday morning at the Lynnwood Convention Center.

The American Red Cross and Premera Blue Cross hosted the free hands-only CPR training. Three morning sessions were held where participants learned learned CPR and also listened to experts discuss personal prepardedness.

Amelia Crawford (8 of Lynnwood), Adrianna Alvarez (7 of Lynnwood), Lindsey Crawford (Lynnwood) and Kate Nolan (7 of Edmonds) practice hands-only CPR.
Amelia Crawford (8 of Lynnwood), Adrianna Alvarez (7 of Lynnwood), Lindsey Crawford (Lynnwood) and Kate Nolan (7 of Edmonds) practice hands-only CPR.

About 200,000 people die from sudden cardiac arrest every year and it’s estimated that 50,000 of those deaths could be prevented. Often emergency personnel are not the first people on the scene of an emergency, so that’s why learning CPR is important. About 80 percent of these incidents occur in the home.

Participants also were encouraged to have a plan in case of a natural disaster/emergency, such as an earthquake, fire, flood or windstorm.

American Red Cross trainer Jill Morrison shows Save-a-Life Saturday participants how to push down on the toy truck as part of hands-only CPR training.
American Red Cross trainer Jill Morrison shows Save-a-Life Saturday participants how to push down on the toy truck as part of hands-only CPR training.

An abbreviated version of a longer personal prepardedness talk offered many tips on how to prepare for an emergency.

Families should decide on a meeting place and also know the emergency plans of their children’s schools. People should set up an out-of-area contact that other family members can call.

People should know how to turn off the water and natural gas in their homes. It’s also recommended that shoes be kept near the bed.

American Red Cross volunteer Dwain Cochron registered a participant in Save-a-Life Saturday.
American Red Cross volunteer Dwain Cochron registers a participant in Save-a-Life Saturday.

An emergency kit should be kept in the home, car and at work. The rule of thumb is that people should have three days of water and food for each person. The food and water should be periodically checked and rotated. Contact information and copies of important papers, such as insurance and identification cards, should be kept in the kit.

Don’t forget about medications, cash (in small denominations), eyeglasses, flashlight and a radio. If you have children, consider a game or toy to keep them occupied. People also should consider pet supplies for their furry friends.

A good way to approach buildiing an emergency kit is to do it over time, say six months, so you won’t get overwhelmed by the task.

For more information on advanced CPR training and other resources see: www.redcross.org.

Hundred of people, including many children, attended hands-only CPR training Saturday morning at the Lynnwood Convention Center.
Hundred of people, including many children, attended hands-only CPR training Saturday morning at the Lynnwood Convention Center.

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