COVID-19 daily report for Mountlake Terrace and Snohomish County: March 24, 2020

Publisher’s note: We have created this ongoing report on information related to COVID-19 as it applies to our communities. It will be updated regularly to reflect changing information.

Our latest coverage

City Council Thursday will consider amending policy so councilmembers can meet remotely

Re-opening date uncertain for MLT’s Concern for Neighbors Food Bank

It’s business as usual for Dick’s Drive-In amid COVID-19 outbreak

Washington State Ferries to remain on winter schedule due to ridership declines

Updated March 24: Directory of Mountlake Terrace restaurants offering takeout, delivery

How to donate needed medical supplies to Swedish loations, including Edmonds

Washington State Department of Health updates

If you have kids, maybe you’ve had a chance to develop your version of the “life’s not fair” speech. Here’s the public health version of it: there’s nothing fair about disease. Families in our state do not have equal access to medical care, or jobs, or food, or housing. And this puts some of our families at higher risk of getting sick, or losing income or even their homes as a result of a serious illness. Even the way we fight the spread of COVID-19 isn’t fair — some of us are able to stay home and protect ourselves and our loved ones, but some of us have to go to work to provide medical care or keep our grocery stores open. Some kids have access to online learning and leftovers in the fridge, and some kids don’t. And some of us will get COVID-19 while others won’t. Some of us will recover, and some of us won’t. Some of us will be able to help others in need and some of us will need help. There’s nothing fair about it, but at least we know we are all in this together.

We’ve loved hearing stories about Washingtonians finding creative ways to help people in their communities who are in need. We’ve heard about Facebook communities connecting people who can help with people who need food or groceries delivered. A medical supply company donated their entire supply of personal protective equipment to local hospital emergency rooms. People are sewing masks in their own homes. Chefs and restaurants are turning their restaurants into community kitchens and providing meals to folks in need and to hard working first responders. Artists are hosting virtual dance classes and live concerts online to keep us entertained. People have found creative ways to help each other, share what they have and build community, all while staying home!

Stay tuned to our blog for more information on how you can help stop the spread of COVID-19.

Daily update on COVID-19 case numbers

Our Department of Health COVID-19 webpage is updated daily with the number of people confirmed to have positive cases and the number of people who have died of COVID-19 in Washington State. As of this writing, 2,469 people in Washington have tested positive for COVID-19, and 123 have died of the disease. We are very likely to see more people with COVID-19 identified in the coming days.

  1. What happened to the sno.co.city by city chart? We have the right to know! Don’t understand why one day it’s there, then gone. What’s up?

    1. Mountlake Terrace is there. Unfortunately there was a glitch in the bottom of the chart and the Terrace part is partially obscured. We’ll fix this for the next report.

  2. Hi – to help apply some more meaning to the statistics, would it be possible to add something about the number of people tested? I’m also interested in knowing the total population of the county.

    It’s actually the percentages that I’m curious about, if that makes it easier.

    Thanks, Tom

    1. There are no testing numbers available on the health district website, which is where we are getting our data. The population of Snohomish County, for your reference, as of July 2019 was 822,083

  3. I know this would be time-consuming, but would it be possible to post percentage figures for each city along with raw numbers? So we could better understand the density. Just asking . . . thank you for doing these graphs in the first place.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *