Restaurant news: MLT’s Time Out offers Greek and American classics, Black Ball opens in nearby Edmonds

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Time Out Moussaka
Time Out Moussaka

“Great Greek food,” a hot tip from Edmonds Community College culinary students, inspired a road trip. Just a short drive down Edmonds Way, under I-5 and into Mountlake Terrace led me to Time Out Greek and American Restaurant. It’s located on the north side of 244th/205th Street, on the opposite corner of the Rite-Aid.

Do not be put off by modest décor. Time Out’s menu offers variety for all appetites: American classics such as Reuben sandwiches, burgers and fish & chips, and breakfasts like corned beef & hash, chicken-fried steak, omelets, pancakes and more. Breakfast is served all day long. Local customers praise authentic ingredients and excellent service.

Giant beans.
Giant beans.

Their Greek food selection includes lamb, gyros, and Greek salad, and a dish I love — and rarely see outside of the deli case — giant baked beans. These are the real deal, huge tender beans in a subtle red tomato/dill sauce that lets the beans have the spotlight. It’s served with pita so you can scoop up every last one. We started our meal with homemade Avgolemono soup, a generous bowl of hearty lemon rice soup, enriched by carrots, celery and onion, accented with mint and tarragon. After the soup and giant geans, I could have stopped and been more than satisfied, but Restaurant News means tasting as much as I can, and companions are willing too, so variety can be shared and compared.

My main dish choice — Moussaka –came with Greek salad and more pita. Fresh greens, olives, peppers and thinly-sliced veggies were topped off with tangy fresh oregano vinaigrette and a mound of fresh grated feta cheese. Oh, the Moussaka! Tender slices of eggplant, zucchini and potatoes are layered like lasagna rich sauce with ground beef, covered with creamy Béchamel sauce and, of course, more of that delicious fresh feta.

Gyro
Gyro

My partner ordered a gyro and so happy he reluctantly shared a few bites. Tender pita wrapped around falafel: crunchy on the outside and perfectly cooked inside. Crisp veggies, tangy tzatziki, and shredded fresh feta finished off the dish.

Thirsty patrons have many good options too. The bar has taps from several local breweries and they offer a selection of private label wines that complement the Greek food menu.

The Time Out Burger
The Time Out Burger

I caught a glimpse of an outrageous burger that took up most of the plate. I’ll be back with my burger-loving boys as dining companions. Feta fries are on my “next visit” list too.

Baklava
Baklava

A display of tempting baklava at the register meant I had to take some home. My grateful family agreed this was a good peace offering, until they could accompany me on the next visit.

PitaSpelledBackwardHere’s a riddle: What is pita spelled backward? A cute hint on the jar at the Time Out’s register. But not needed, we had an excellent waitress.

A little history: The Flemetakis family started Time Out Greek and American Restaurant in 2004. The original space began with three tables and a basic menu. Success meant expansion of location and food items. Mom and Pop: Emmanuel and Georgia are still on hand to greet customers. Their sons Nikolaos and Demetrios are on board to ensure their parents’ successful restaurant will continue for years to come.

TA DAH! The Black Ball at 22001 Highway 99, #300 in Edmonds is finally open! Word of their soft opening spread like wildfire and long lines formed at opening time. I visited and found the location to be bustling with customers, young, old, families with children. This is not just a fad hangout for teenagers, it is a destination. Customers braved traffic to arrive and savor the Black Ball original Taiwanese desserts and teas.

Edmonds should be proud: There are only two other Black Ball locations in the whole USA — both in California. There are about 50 franchises in the entire world.

One young couple drove all the way to Edmonds from Bellevue. They were excited and we spoke about the differences between a cup of tea at many coffee and tea places, versus the quality and care that Black Ball puts into selections of their teas. Healthy options allow one to select how much sugar is in their drinks and the attentions to providing organic ingredients were important values.

Black Ball employees.
Black Ball employees.

Greeted by local manager Tim, and a Black Ball company support person and trainer Janice, I was presented with a tray of items and sampled the various ways one can enjoy these healthy desserts and teas. There are three distinct versions- Grass Jelly, Aiyu Jelly and Matcha Jelly. Customers can choose to enjoy the jellies Iced, Cold, Warm or Hot. Toppings may be selected to enhance the base of jelly.

First way to taste is ICED- think Hawaiian shave ice only more refined and flavorful. Grass Jelly Black Ball is herbal and tasted mellow. Aiyu Jelly is a slightly sour lemon taste, refreshing in the iced version. COLD is gelatinous, and fun to eat. I giggled a bit as I captured a spoonful.

The WARM and HOT desserts are like soup. Toppings make the dish. Taro and yam, sweet potato and jellies are offered in balls or cubes, and join several varieties of organic beans to add texture and variety to the beverages and puddings. I loved the Boba topping. Boba reminded me of giant pearl tapioca, a favorite dessert.

The other drinks can be in form of fresh-brewed tea, or combined with various fruits. Real fruits are used, never syrups, and taste is proof of this fact. Tim stressed that all ingredients are sourced from Taiwan and only from organic sources. The sugar is a unique blend of brown sugar syrup and one can choose how much is in the tea or other beverages.  I choose the 30-percent portion and my teas were flavorful and fruit tastes dominated. My Winter Melon tea tasted like fresh melon. Delicious.

— By Kathy Passage

Kathy Passage Hi ResA specialty gourmet food broker for over 30 years, Kathy Passage has in-depth knowledge on food and the special qualities of ingredients used in the exquisite products she helped bring to market. Kathy brings this unique perspective from the “other side of the plate” to writing about the local food and restaurant scene.

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