Reminder: Low impact development principles topic of Sept. 13 meeting

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Developers will eventually be facing new City of Mountlake Terrace regulations as to how they handle stormwater runoff at their projects as the state is requiring municipalities to revamp various ordinances. Mountlake Terrace officials will be hosting an open house on Tuesday, Sept. 13, to introduce low impact development principles and how they might be implemented by the city.
Developers will eventually be facing new City of Mountlake Terrace regulations as to how they handle stormwater runoff at their projects as the state is requiring municipalities to revamp various ordinances. Mountlake Terrace officials will be hosting an open house on Tuesday, Sept. 13, to introduce low impact development principles and how they might be implemented by the city. (Photo by Doug Petrowski)

The City of Mountlake Terrace will be hosting an open house Tuesday, Sept. 13, to introduce low impact development (LID) principles and how they might by implemented by the city.

The event is scheduled to take place at the Ballinger Clubhouse, 23000 Lakeview Drive, between 6-8 p.m.

Low impact development is an approach to stormwater management that attempts to mimic a site’s pre-development hydrology through on-site infiltration, absorption and evapotranspiration processes rather than collecting stormwater and sending it downstream.

Cities are being required by the Washington State’s Department of Ecology to update their municipal codes in order to make LID the preferred and commonly-used approach to stormwater management.

At the Sept. 13 open house, city officials will be available to answer questions concerning what LID is and how it works, present contracting exhibits showing street designs under current development standards and what they might look like under LID standards, and explain how the role of trees at a site and throughout the city affect LID.

The open house is part of a 17-month process for the city concerning potential new development regulations; city officials hope to be able to submit new LID ordinances to the state’s Department of Commerce for a 60-day review in October 2017.

 

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