Medical Marijuana Market Trying to Open in MLT

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King 5 has the scoop on a couple of men who are trying to open an office with a storefront where they would sell medical marijuana. The name of their company is BUDS (Botanical Urban Dispensary Service) and they have recently obtained a state business license. The only problem is that the city of Mountlake Terrace has denied their application for a city business license, saying that the law does not allow for a storefront medical marijuana dispensary.

Although medical marijuana has been legal for more than a decade, patients say they still have big problems getting it.

Now two men want to give Mountlake Terrace what you might call a “marijuana mart.”

The business is called BUDS – Botanical Urban Dispensary Service. And inside, co-owner Todd Madison is ready to serve one of several varieties of marijuana.

They interviewed a few people outside Roger’s and one woman responded, “Oh my God – I don’t think so”. Another person responded, “As far as marijuana – if it helps some people they should make it work.”

What do you think?

[image courtesy NoHoDamon]

100 COMMENTS

  1. @Angela do you know any one of these men trying to open this mart ? Not going to blast names but let's just say , he's not a law abiding citizen. I won't go into details but it is public information , the one gentleman has quite record..indeed check it out πŸ™‚ I agree we need these clinics for ACTUAL patients w/ACTUAL perscriptions but what we don't need are drug dealers w/no experience other than selling/growing and happened to scam the state for a card..rewatch the video , only difference between this and selling on the streets …they managed to obtain enough money to rent a building.

  2. I agree we need these clinics for ACTUAL patients w/ACTUAL perscriptions but what we don’t need are drug dealers w/no experience other than selling/growing and happened to scam the state for a card..rewatch the video , only difference between this and selling on the streets …they managed to obtain enough money to rent a building.

  3. Let me start with an prologue that I know marijuana exists, in legal form and illegal form, and also fully support the medicinal use of it legally. I don't want any misunderstandings here…I think this has to be the most ludicrous idea I've ever heard, and I'm glad the city denied them. I will be on the lookout for any open townhall meetings to voice my opinions. The problem lies not in the marijuana itself, but the abuse of it by those not legally entitled to carry it or use it. We have tight regulations on other controlled substances through pharmacies, with licensed technicians and schooled pharmacists to handle dangerous, addictive but needed drugs. Shouldn't medicinal MJ be handled the same? If we allow this type of retail specialty store to open, what's next, Narcotics-R-Us: “Pick up your Percocet here, provided you have a prescription. We use it ourselves, we're not licensed, but it's okay!!” Currently there's no regulation of selling or inspecting this type of 'prescription' drug, and it's the government's responsibility to step in and do so. Otherwise, the next thing you know, on Friday night, your son or daughter will be making a pot run to the local store that doesn't check for a prescription, much like all the rest of us did for beer or liquor.

  4. Let me start with an prologue that I know marijuana exists, in legal form and illegal form, and also fully support the medicinal use of it legally. I don’t want any misunderstandings here…nnI think this has to be the most ludicrous idea I’ve ever heard, and I’m glad the city denied them. I will be on the lookout for any open townhall meetings to voice my opinions. nnThe problem lies not in the marijuana itself, but the abuse of it by those not legally entitled to carry it or use it. We have tight regulations on other controlled substances through pharmacies, with licensed technicians and schooled pharmacists to handle dangerous, addictive but needed drugs. Shouldn’t medicinal MJ be handled the same? If we allow this type of retail specialty store to open, what’s next, Narcotics-R-Us: “Pick up your Percocet here, provided you have a prescription. We use it ourselves, we’re not licensed, but it’s okay!!” Currently there’s no regulation of selling or inspecting this type of ‘prescription’ drug, and it’s the government’s responsibility to step in and do so. Otherwise, the next thing you know, on Friday night, your son or daughter will be making a pot run to the local store that doesn’t check for a prescription, much like all the rest of us did for beer or liquor.

    • According the the statistics of the National Office of Drug Control Policy 500 people in the USA die every year from misusing aspirin.nnI can buy aspirin now, I could have bought it when I was a child.nnHow many people die every year from the misuse of marijuana?nnAccording to those same statistics, it is exactly ZERO.nnOne of the safest drugs known to mankind, used for medicinal, spiritual & recreational purposes for thousands of years is illegal, evil, unclean…and “the primary reason to outlaw marijuana is its effect on the degenerate races.”nnBut aspirin & IB profen, which literally KILL people is ok over the counter?nnPersonally, I’d rather my son or daughter make a pot run than an alcohol run. At least they can’t overdose on pot.nnBut if you’re serious about keeping drugs away from kids, you need to get them out of the hands of criminals & allow legitimate business persons with licenses to distribute them to adults who want them. Right now, any kid can pick up pot, easier than beer. Probably percacet too.nnLegal drug deaths have skyrocketed above MVA deaths in WA state. Rx drug use is one of the fastest growing trends among teens. What’s the solution there?nnProhibition offers us no control over potentially dangerous substances, and infringes on our fundamental rights to determine what can & can’t go into our own body.nnThese two guys in particular do not impress me, but what they’re speaking out against, and who they are fighting for rings true for me, and I support anyone who takes a risk to advance more ethical & harm reduction drug policies.nnThe state law is flawed in many many ways, the federal ban in much more (& hypocritical at that, since they actually distribute it themselves) & our cultures vilification of one drug while we plaster sports stadiums with another. I don’t understand how anyone can look at the situation with drugs we’re currently in & maintain that things are hunky-dorrey & nothing needs to be changed.nnIncarcerex, it’s a helleva drug.

      • I’m not sure what scares me more, the thought of a marijuana store in Mountlake Terrace, or the knowledge that someone can actually write the above statement and believe the twisted ‘facts’. Before spewing off statistics, you should probably convey them in a context that is consistent and accurate.

        • Please illustrate how you believe the statistics I cited were inconsistent, inaccurate or out of context.nnI was referring to the specific risk of death from ingesting a drug.nnThere are many deaths in this country due to marijuana prohibition, including many law enforcement officers & innocent non-drug users like 92 year old Kathryn Johnston, but there are no recorded deaths from ingesting the drug alone. Not last year. Not ever. Please, if you have information which refutes this statement, I am very curious to know about it.nnUnlike aspirin, which can kill you if you simply take too much of it.

          • The U.S. Department of Social and Health Services’ (DSHS) DAWN program, through the Office of Applied Studies (OAS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health ServicesrnAdministration (SAMHSA), and by RTI International (a trade name of Research Triangle Institute, under contract number 280-03-2602, noted 18 marijuana related deaths in 2007 for the Seattle-Tacoma/Pierce County area alone. DAWN defines a death in this category as: “any death reviewed by an ME/C that was related to recent drug use”rnrnLook it up. And don’t rely on ‘drugwarfacts.com’ for your information. That’s like relying on FOX news for bypartisan political news.rnrnhttps://dawninfo.samhsa.gov/default.asp

          • First, your link doesn’t work, here’s the correct one: https://dawninfo.samhsa.gov/files/ME2007/State-… (I think the post had a trailing ; on it)Second, you make a statement about the stats, but fail to indicate its relevance. So, because no one DIRECTLY died from ingesting marijuana, it’s okay? According to the same document, no one DIRECTLY died from hallucinogens or benzodiazepines… so, they aren’t dangerous? Additionally, and this is where it’s interesting, the document also listed ZERO for single use drug deaths for “Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents”… also known as aspirin. Thank you for pointing this out!Third, yes, you’re right, and the metabolic rate for all drugs is known and measurable, to the point of knowing last ingestion of said drug at time of measure. Because we know how each drug is metabolized in the system, and level of said drug in the system can lead to a fairly good window of last ingestion, we can rule out cause of death being related to drug if beyond the point of conscious, physical and mental impairment.All that being said, I’m not here to argue whether drugs are good or bad or what can kill you and what can’t. I simply don’t want a retail store in my neighborhood that sells marijuana, legal or not, unless it’s run in a manner that’s consistent across the county and the state. I’m not saying I’m totally against the idea, just the idea of being the first, in this type of residential neighborhood, and with the type of people that were attempting this.

          • You have people in your neighborhood selling marijuana, whether you want them to be or not. Right now.nnUntil we face facts and deal with our problems with drug abuse as they really are, and not how we would like them to be, we are mandating criminality, police corruption, lives ruined over legal repercussions, and allowing drug dealers to decide who should & shouldn’t have access to substances, adults or not.nnAs far as legalization goes, as a parent, I ask myself, u201cwhat are the dangers to teens?u201d And, what are the likely scenarios? If pot is still illegal to anyone under 21, how will teens get it? I think the most likely scenario is the same as beer and cigarettes. Older brothers and sisters, with IDs, will legally buy packaged marijuana cigarettes at gas stations and share them with younger ones on Friday night parties. As a parent, I ask myself, u201chow do I feel about this?u201d Andu2026 after a little thought, I actually feel better knowing my child is with trusted friends, ingesting measured substances than on a corner at night buying an illegal substance from a stranger.nnReefer madness is alive & well, and the “not in my backyard” mentality only prolongs the harm that prohibition brings to our community. I don’t know these guys, or what “kind of people they are” beyond what the article has stated, but I support anybody who brings attention to our counterproductive and asinine policies. Hooray for them speaking out and taking action to point out how ludicrous our policies are! Success or not for their immediate adventure, at least they have garnered a discussion in our community.nnYou want to eradicate cannabis from the earth? You might as well set out to rid the planet of dandelions. In the mean time, understanding the history behind these laws is essential to fixing the problems associated with them.nnThe city of MLT has already shelled out hundreds of thousands of dollars firing a skilled & intelligent officer because he chose to speak out on the failure of the war on drug users… how much more needless death & crime do we need to see, and how much more money do we need to pay out before we can deal with the reality of drug use constructively, instead of in denial?

          • First off , Let’s be honest here , With the legalize all drugs mission you are on , I can’t imagine you being a parent so unless you are a devoted parent it would be hard for me as to see things on the same wave length. You expressed too much enthusiasm for the men in this ridiculous business venture of theirs , no one has said that the clinics should not be allowed to operate as a clinic for medical marijuana patients. Medical marijuana has been said to be a medication legal to use with a prescription as I know it , the law requires all prescriptions to be handled by a ‘licensed pharmacist’! What you are actually trying to convince people of is to let drug dealers move into neighborhoods and just be silent about it because they are already in neighborhoods ? What ? Do you think people chose to have them there ? Just vote YES cause it’s already there anyways, I hope for the sake of all mankind you are NOT a parent! I am in and out of schools all week around parents at after school programs , I must say I have been fortunate to have never encountered a parent that shares the same views as yourself on drugs.You have stated you do not know the men mentioned , leads one to ponder the truth in that . “A mother is never alone in her thoughts , A mother must always think twice , one for her herself and once for her child”. It’s no Albert Einstein quote but it’s one I’m extremely fond of and live by πŸ™‚

          • Oh, I do love a good “no true Scotsman” argument. What a fantastic way to discredit my position without even contemplating it for yourself.nnNo good parent could possibly take an objective look at our current system of failed prohibition & speak out against what they see? They couldn’t find the War on Drugs to be a negative, rather than a positive influence on their children?nnSeriously, the audacity of such a generalization is so completely predictable it would be funny if it weren’t so destructive and dehumanizing. Former Seattle police chief Norm Stamper is a father & grandfather who speaks out as a prominent leader of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition. He’s written a great deal about his first hand experiences with enforcing drug laws… he is not only in favor of legalizing marijuana, but all drugs as well.nnSo, you haven’t met any other parents that are outspoken with their disgust for the War on Drugs. Have you asked?nnAdvocating for the legalization and control of illicit drugs does not demand one to advocate they’re use. Advocating blanket prohibition demands that these dangerous substances be controlled by criminals and thugs.nn”Marijuana never kicks down your door in the middle of the night.nMarijuana never locks up sick and dying people,ndoes not suppress medical research,ndoes not peek in bedroom windows.nEven if one takes every reefer madness allegationnof the prohibitionists at face value,nmarijuana prohibition has done far more harmnto far more people than marijuana ever could.” nWilliam F. BuckleynnCheck out the link to see Republican MOTHER (omg, for real? like, why hasn’t CPS totally been to take her kids?) express her perspective on this contentious issue. πŸ˜‰

          • One woman’s opinion is all that link provided , just as you & I have done here. What part of ” I am in & out of schools all week , talking to many families” did you not comprehend ? You are entitled to your opinion ,there’s no need to get so angry , we can agree to disagree.Good luck to you and your friends that are trying to open this mart , the ones you have so fiercely backed with such ridiculous opinionated links πŸ™‚

          • I don’t know those guys beyond the article here, let alone call them friends. nnI like your further attempt to prove me guilty by association with an incorrect hunch. You also express a lack of understanding of the law since doctors do not actually prescribe Medical Marijuana, because federal law precludes them from doing so. They can only “recommend” a patient will benefit from it. WA state does not have a system for medical marijuana. The only thing our law does is protect patients & their caregivers from prosecution by giving them a positive defense WHEN they’re arrested. It doesn’t stop cops from arresting sick people over their choice of medicine, and it doesn’t facilitate regulatory standards of any kind beyond limits of what amount of medicine qualifies for a positive defense or not.nnFrom the information available, these guys appear to be quite inept, compared to those who have successfully established dispensary models in other states, and I state quite clearly that I support their efforts only because I support anybody who brings attention to our counterproductive policies regarding drugs.nThey are no Norm Stamper, Rick Steves or former MLT Sergeant Jonathan Wender in reputation or authority on the matter… but at least they’re actions have brought the questions of the effectiveness of blanket prohibition into the light.nnYou ASSume that I know them, or have a personal interest in their venture. But you’re wrong. Philosophical support of their cause (vs their endeavor), and finding value in using the opportunity of a community forum to express that position is possible without intimate knowledge of these individuals.nnIt is possible to be an active, supportive & involved parent AND be disgusted by the War on Drugs at the same time. So disgusted that staying silent and muzzled by the threats & intimidation of prohibitionist zealots no longer seems like an option. That is why I cited Jessica Corry & Norm Stamper as public figures who are examples of what you can’t seem to comprehend: good parents can support drug prohibition reform. Jessica Corry cites a number of verifiable date & facts to support her opinion. She expresses the position of pragmatic and drug policy reform in a straight-forward, constitutional based fashion which is based on protecting kids from criminals & thugs. nDo you talk about drug policy on a regular basis with parents? Not just drug use/abuse, but macro drug policy? And you feel like a parent who may support legalization reform but is not an active advocate is likely to voice that position in a school setting? LOLnn:D

          • The Drug Free America Foundation stated in its “Myths About the Drug War” posted on its web site rn”Under a legalization scenario, a black market for drugs would still exist. If drugs were legal for those over 18 or 21, there would be a market for everyone under that age. People under the age of 21 consume the majority of illegal drugs, and so an illegal market and organized crime to supply it would remainu2014along with the organized crime that profits from it. After Prohibition ended, did the organized crime in our country go down? No. It continues today in a variety of other criminal enterprises. Legalization would not put the cartels out of business; cartels would simply look to other illegal endeavors…. rnWhile ‘government drugs’ could conceivably be priced low enough to eliminate competition, perhaps by having taxpayers subsidize them to discourage a black market, the combination of low price and wide availability would result in greater consumption, and consequently increased addiction. Increased consumption and addiction lead to drug-related crime. This government regulation argument ignores the dangerously addictive nature of drugs. And finally, under a legalization scenario, a black market for drugs would still exist. If drugs were legal for those over 18 or 21, there would be a market for everyone under that age –a faction of the population that can be targeted by those looking to profit from the sale of drugs.”rnrn – Drug Free America Foundation rnrn——————————————————————————–rnCharles D. Mabry, MD, Assistant Professor at the College of Medicine at the University of Arkansas, wrote an article titled “Physicians and the War on Drugs: The Case Against Legalization” published in the Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons that:rn”Does making addictive drugs illegal work? Cocaine and potent narcotics were freely sold in America until the first two decades of the 20th century, and the number of patients addicted dropped sharply once availability was curtailed…. rnMore recently, several European countries have experimented with various attempts to legalize or decriminalize some illegal drugs. These experiments have resulted in a rise in the number of drug-addicted patients and a corresponding increase in the crime rate…. rnThe National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse has stated the situation concerning illicit drugs in this country most eloquently: ‘Drugs are not a threat to American society because they are illegal; they are illegal because they are a threat to American society.’… rnThere is another stark reality: In some cases, the only thing that forces someone who is addicted to drugs and spiraling out of control into therapy is the threat (or reality) of incarceration. Do away with laws prohibiting sale of these drugs, and you do away with the only hope of help for so many people who are addicted but just canu2019t stop themselves.”rnrn – Charles D. Mabry, MD rnrn——————————————————————————–rnAnn Coulter, JD, author, wrote in her article “Don’t Do Drug Legalization” for Townhall.com that:rn”The most superficially appealing argument for drug legalization is that people should be allowed to do what they want with their own bodies, even if it ruins their lives. Except that’s not true. Back on Earth, see, we live in a country that will not allow people to live with their own stupid decisions. Ann has to pay for their stupid decisions. rn’We’ have to ‘invest’ in ‘our’ future by supporting people who freely choose to inject drugs in their own bodies and then become incapable of holding jobs, obtaining housing and taking care of their children. So it’s not really quite accurate to say drugs hurt no one but the user, at least until we’ve repealed the welfare state…. rnDrugs enslave people. So do cigarettes and alcohol, the drug legalizers say….. Assume alcohol and cigarettes induce dependency, ruin lives, cause disease, depression, countless traffic injuries and fatalities, and increase the incidence of homicide and suicide. This is supposed to be an argument for legalizing another drug like them?” http://www.stoptheaclu.com/2005/08/11/aclu-wants-all-drugs-legal/

          • Legalization & control is not an option because there will always be a black market for kids? Except there is alcohol & tobacco… and there IS a black market for underage kids. I support enforcing laws which limit this black market, and I would support the same laws which protect kids from other drugs if they became regulated for an adult market. Education is also a key component of discouraging experimentation. HONEST, science-based education is the key, though.nnYou commit a crime against another person or their property because you were on drugs? That’s still a crime. You neglect your kids? Still a crime. Provide drugs to kids w/o a doctor’s prescription for medical necessity? Still a crime. Commit any offense against another person or property? Still a crime!nnJaycee Lee Dugard was kidnapped & held captive by Phillip Garrido because he was let out of prison for an earlier kidnapping & assault BECAUSE he claimed being on drugs at the time made him commit his previous crime. nNo, you know what. That’s not okay. He knew what he was doing, he knew that if he took drugs he would kidnap & rape a woman in a storage container, and being on drugs is no excuse for such depraved indifference to human life. Since the inception of the Bureau of Narcotics, criminals have used “I was high” to receive leniency. I don’t think that’s right at all. If you knowingly take drugs, and as a result of your impaired state commit a crime, you are just as culpable as if you were sober… but our current system of laws REWARDS drug use by violent criminals, and offers them an avenue to excuse their behavior.nn**The USA spends about 300 Billion more dollars every year fighting the war on drugs than we spend on fighting the growing illicit trade of human beings.**nn**Half of our veterans in prison right now are there for drug charges.**nn**Marijuana is easier for teens to get than alcohol or tobacco.**nn**Washington state has seen Rx drug deaths surpass MVA deaths in the last year.**nnAll drugs are dangerous if used incorrectly, and use by underage kids is only made more accessible by forcing them onto the black market.nnThe Drug Free America Foundation is funded by donations from many organizations… their goal is not to reduce drug use & abuse, but to “oppose ballot initiatives that would reduce criminal penalties on illegal drugs”nnThat’s a pretty clear mandate, which demands more prison inmates, stiffer penalties for sick people & to focus law enforcement resources on drug crimes. We have the largest prison inmate population in the world & it continues to grow. Is it because Americans are inherently evil, weak or criminally insane, more so than the rest of the world?nnhawks2win, and anyone else who says they don’t support “legalizing drugs” that doesn’t support re-criminalizing alcohol are hypocrites. Plain & simple. A drug is a drug is a drug. At least if you supported prohibition of alcohol, your position would be consistent.nnParenting your child to stay away from drugs is a good thing, and nobody, especially Law Enforcement Against Prohibition is saying that we should just throw the flood gates open. nThe bottom line is our system for controlling drugs is broken, people are suffering & dying. Even people who have nothing to do with any drugs have been killed in the name of the drug war. And all the while, drug cartels & dealers are making more money than we could even dream of funding into the fight against them.nnIllegal drug dealers like prohibition. They LOVE that you’re so scared to educate and prepare your child for a paradigm where they do not control the flow of drug supplies to our population. Your fear, your denial and your blind allegiance to those working to maintain the failed status quo is exactly what makes illegal drugs such a profitable business.nnDrugs make their way into the highest security prisons in our nation, where all semblance of personal space and privacy are stripped away from inmates. How on earth do you expect to keep them away from people who want them in a free society?nnThe truth is that we CAN’T. There is no way to rid the world & the human condition of the urge to use & abuse drugs 100%. Well, short of obliterating the human race or finding a magical unicorn that grants wishes. Neither of those seem like viable plans, and since we’ve seen that as arrests & seizures increase, so does consumption, then maybe we should consider alternatives to the path we’ve taken for the past 75 years?nnNo?nnYou must be smoking crack.

          • What happens when you assume?nnYou make an ASS out of U & Me!nn:DnnI only have a personal interest because I know people who suffer from MS & other debilitating disorders which are aided by marijuana. I have seen their pain & I have been relayed the risks of obtaining their medicine through black market means. They have explained to me the cost, energy and danger of growing their own, both in terms of legal prosecution & being victims of criminals who are after their medicine. nI have also seen the waste of our resources by firing upstanding police officers like Sergeant Wender from our local force over his public support of drug policy reform. We also ended up paying out a 6 figure settlement for infringing his First Amendment right to freedom of speech. Local efficiency of resources, anyone?nnYou’ve deluded yourselves into believing that I, or anyone else that holds my position of reform is in favor of drug abuse. I would be tempted to infer that you get a bit of a neurochemical high from your sadomoralist mantra. From this limited interaction, though, I wouldn’t ASSume that without further evidence of an addiction to your sense of superiority. I like evidence… and facts.nnDrugs are a very serious public health dilemma, and making it a criminal justice issue where there are no other crimes committed has proven time & again to foster police corruption, gang violence & larger profits for criminals.nBut you’re cool with that because it makes you FEEL better to believe that our public servants are risking their lives to police what an adult chooses to do with their own body. Even though it’s easier for kids to get illegal drugs than alcohol, the idea of regulating them in a similar fashion to alcohol is somehow ridiculous?nnLike I said… unless you support re-criminalizing alcohol for adult consumption, you’re a hypocrite. πŸ™‚

          • WOW! Guess everyone’s allowed to speak their mind just as long as it is what you believe in right ? Maybe these are all FACTS in your mind but there are many different FACTS that can be used to back the theory why it is not in the best interest of the children or many people in FACT not to legalize drugs. As I have stated before I really hope you are not a parent not only because your delusional way of thinking way but also for the way you speak to another human being. Accusing someone of smoking crack , that you’ve never met! Just unbelievably sad! American Criminal Liberals Union…ACLU would that be you? You must be proud πŸ˜€ Good day to you & we are done here!

          • I’m infinitely entertained by your inability to take my crack joke with a sense of humor. It’s a symbolic pejorative.nnConstitutional, social & fiscal conservatism is the basis for my position. I may concur with the ACLU in terms of personal liberty over one’s own body, but that doesn’t mean I represent them or endorse every single one of their positions. I certainly don’t support leniency for criminals simply because they were on drugs when they committed their crimes, as I clearly stated in regards to the tragic case of Jaycee Lee Dugard. The ACLU didn’t draft the US constitutional commitment to protect freedom of speech, and I don’t see why you find no qualms with paying out hundreds of thousands of dollars so MLT can violate a decorated officer’s right to express his position in regards to the drug war our police risk their lives to battle.nnI really hope you’re preparing your children for the world as it really is, and not how you would prefer it to be in your fantasy world where 100% drug eradication is a possibility.nnConservatives, Guns, and Drugsnby Sheldon Richman, September 2002nhttp://www.fff.org/freedom/fd0209e.aspnn”I said GOOD DAY, sir!”nYou crack me up. πŸ˜€

          • You love being center of attention that is a FACT , that’s what this has become , a link where Angie ,Alison, LEAP and so on (ALL being you) gets attention LOL Well indeed you have been noticed. Sad that MLT residents can not voice their opinion w/o you slandering them or degrading them with your “mature” snide remarks! You are answering for every single comment made here & YOU are the only one that matters right ? Throwing temper tantrums and accusing someone of smoking crack to get your own way & the unicorn crap because someone disagrees with you!??? Grow up! This childish so called debate has completely discusted me along with becoming boring in a hurry!

          • I just want to say that I’m sorry if my playful way with language rubbed you the wrong way. I have personally seen much suffering in the name of maintaining our current policies, and feel strongly about the benefit of reform. I was mainly disturbed by the suggestion that someone was incapable of being a good parent because they found the war on drugs to be detrimental to society. I’ve already listed a few public figures which contradict this assertion, but I also took it as a personal attack.nnThere is no need to fling personal attacks, and the “you’re on crack” could be misinterpreted as an insult, rather than the unsuccessful attempt to add levity to the conversation that it was.nnI don’t support illegal drug use. I don’t support criminals. I don’t support giving marijuana to children (with the exception of medical applications under the supervision of a doctor when no safer/better alternatives are available/effective)nnI support taking an analytical and pragmatic approach to an issue which we will probably never be rid of, at least not in my lifetime.nnIt’s a contentious issue, which has long been applied to the more general ideological & cultural battle of the left vs the right. It is not about ideology, but about dealing with a very serious problem (drug use) in the best way possible: reduce the harm drugs cause to the user & society.nnThere are many and varied issues to consider, and every drug (legal or not) has individual risks and benefits which must be considered scientifically and objectively to formulate effective policy which helps 1)discourage people using drugs they don’t medically need 2)stop/lower drug-related crime & 3)limit access to children.nnI really & sincerely hope that you never have to deal with a loved one losing their life or freedom because of drugs & the enforcement of their prohibition, but I also hope you understand that there are many of us who have seen much suffering & death in the name of our vain attempt at drug obliteration. Sacrificing civility because of the personal pain I have suffered over the experiences of people close to me is regrettable.

          • Not a problem ! Apology accepted ,we have different views on the matter is all & that’s ok! good luck to you!

          • Hallucinogens : ZERO deaths in 2006 or 2007 , we should legalize them too right ? No one died , thanks Alison for the partial link , Mark for the correction to that link

          • When smoked, marijuana releases the brain’s pleasure chemical, dopamine, into its system, producing an euphoric high. This affects the areas of the brain that also respond to food, sleep and drink, which is why users often have the “munchies” and seem relaxed. This is misleading in a sense because the respiratory and circulatory systems actually speed up. Breathing becomes more labored and the heart works harder. Chronic use makes the user very susceptible to health problems like heart attacks, strokes and cancer of the lungs and throat.rnrnLike any drug that affects the mind and body, marijuana can become addicting as the body becomes dependent on it. The brain adapts to the stimulation of its pleasure centers and can rewire itself after repeated reinforcement. The withdrawal symptoms of irritability or sleeplessness can occur if the user quits taking the drug. Those who are dependent and have tried to quit without help often find difficulty in doing so for any significant length of time, and will pick up again.rnrnAnother characteristic of continued marijuana use is the diminishing effects of the euphoria and the increasing consequences of the side effects. Effects on the brain include:rnrnMemory problemsrnLearning difficultiesrnLack of concentrationrnLoss of coordinationrnIncreased paranoiarnIncreased fearrnEmotional isolationrnLessens judgment , you’re right the plant itself can’t be blamed for the death of anyone just a slight problem with all the above but hey nobody died right, you’ve got to be kidding me , with all those symptoms or side affects you might as well be!

          • Personally… I think your post makes an excellent point. Something with such powerful impact on the human system should be regulated, controlled & distributed only to adults with informed consent regarding the risks, and/or patients under the supervision of a trained medical physician when safer treatments are not available/effective.nnFor instance, alcohol is not available to just anyone BECAUSE it’s so dangerous to the human body. You need to be 21 or older to be able to buy it. There are stiff penalties for supplying it to a minor, and criminal charges for the purchaser and/or store which facilitates such transactions. Isn’t it great that the dangerous drug of alcohol is not primarily in the domain of vicious & violent criminals?nnAlcohol may be the world’s oldest known drug. Fermented grain, fruit juice and honey have been used to make alcohol (ethyl alcohol or ethanol) for thousands of years. The production of products containing alcohol has become big business in today’s society and the consumption and abuse of alcohol has become a major public health problem. nnAlcohol is a central nervous system depressant. It acts at many sites, including the reticular formation, spinal cord, cerebellum and cerebral cortex, and on many neurotransmitter systems. Alcohol is a very small molecule and is soluble in “lipid” and water solutions. Because of these properties, alcohol gets into the bloodstream very easily and also crosses the blood brain barrier. Some of the neurochemical effects of alcohol are:nn * Increased turnover of norepinephrine and dopaminen * Decreased transmission in acetylcholine systemsn * Increased transmission in GABA systemsn * Increased production of beta-endorphin in the hypothalamus nnChronic drinking can lead to dependence and addiction to alcohol and to additional neurological problems. Typical symptoms of withholding alcohol from someone who is addicted to it are shaking (tremors), sleep problems and nausea. More severe withdrawal symptoms include hallucinations and even seizures.nnChronic alcohol use can:nn * Damage the frontal lobes of the brainn * Cause an overall reduction in brain size and increase in the size of the ventriclesn * Lead to alcoholism (addiction to alcohol) and result in tolerance to the effects of alcohol and variety of health problemsn * Cause a vitamin deficiency. Because the digestion system of alcoholics is unable to absorb vitamin B-1 (thiamine), a syndrome known as “Wernicke’s Encephalopathy” may develop. This syndrome is characterized by impaired memory, confusion and lack of coordination. Further deficiencies of thiamine can lead to “Korsakoff’s Syndrome.” This disorder is characterized by amnesia, apathy and disorientation. Widespread disease of the brain is a feature of both Wernicke’s and Korsakoff’s Syndromes.nnThe body responds to alcohol in stages, which correspond to an increase in Blood Alcohol Content (BAC):nn 1. Euphoria (BAC = 0.03 to 0.12 percent)n * They become more self-confident or daring.n * Their attention span shortens.n * They may look flushed.n * Their judgement is not as good — they may say the first thought that comes to mind, rather than an appropriate comment for the given situation.n * They have trouble with fine movements, such as writing or signing their name. nn 2. Excitement (BAC = 0.09 to 0.25 percent)n * They become sleepy.n * They have trouble understanding or remembering things (even recent events).n * They do not react to situations as quickly (if they spill a drink they may just stare at it).n * Their body movements are uncoordinated.n * They begin to lose their balance easily.n * Their vision becomes blurry.n * They may have trouble sensing things (hearing, tasting, feeling, etc.). nn 3. Confusion (BAC = 0.18 to 0.30 percent)n * They are confused — might not know where they are or what they are doing.n * They are dizzy and may stagger.n * They may be highly emotional — aggressive, withdrawn or overly affectionate.n * They cannot see clearly.n * They are sleepy.n * They have slurred speech.n * They have uncoordinated movements (trouble catching an object thrown to them).n * They may not feel pain as readily as a sober person. nn 4. Stupor (BAC = 0.25 to 0.4 percent)n * They can barely move at all.n * They cannot respond to stimuli.n * They cannot stand or walk.n * They may vomit.n * They may lapse in and out of consciousness. nn 5. Coma (BAC = 0.35 to 0.50 percent)n * They are unconscious.n * Their reflexes are depressed (i.e. their pupils do not respond appropriately to changes in light).n * They feel cool (lower-than-normal body temperature).n * Their breathing is slower and more shallow.n * Their heart rate may slow.n * They may die. nn 6. Death (BAC more than 0.50 percent) – The person usually stops breathing and dies.

          • who said anything about alcohol ? Let’s talk about that , legalizing it didn’t work out so well so why would we unleash another ? You have some issues my friend some serious issues!

      • there is nothing on the market that actually relievs headaches in 5-10 minutes. acetominophin, ibuprofin, and the other generics dont work (let alone in 5-10 min.) if i choose to use pot for this purpose why can you tell me i cant? and as you said, the otc pain meds can kill you but theyre legal?

  5. According the the statistics of the National Office of Drug Control Policy 500 people in the USA die every year from misusing aspirin.I can buy aspirin now, I could have bought it when I was a child.How many people die every year from the misuse of marijuana?According to those same statistics, it is exactly ZERO.One of the safest drugs known to mankind, used for medicinal, spiritual & recreational purposes for thousands of years is illegal, evil, unclean…and “the primary reason to outlaw marijuana is its effect on the degenerate races.”But aspirin & IB profen, which literally KILL people is ok over the counter?Personally, I'd rather my son or daughter make a pot run than an alcohol run. At least they can't overdose on pot.But if you're serious about keeping drugs away from kids, you need to get them out of the hands of criminals & allow legitimate business persons with licenses to distribute them to adults who want them. Right now, any kid can pick up pot, easier than beer. Probably percacet too.Legal drug deaths have skyrocketed above MVA deaths in WA state. Rx drug use is one of the fastest growing trends among teens. What's the solution there?Prohibition offers us no control over potentially dangerous substances, and infringes on our fundamental rights to determine what can & can't go into our own body.These two guys in particular do not impress me, but what they're speaking out against, and who they are fighting for rings true for me, and I support anyone who takes a risk to advance more ethical & harm reduction drug policies.The state law is flawed in many many ways, the federal ban in much more (& hypocritical at that, since they actually distribute it themselves) & our cultures vilification of one drug while we plaster sports stadiums with another. I don't understand how anyone can look at the situation with drugs we're currently in & maintain that things are hunky-dorrey & nothing needs to be changed.Incarcerex, it's a helleva drug.

    • Is it so hard for you to wrap your mind around the concept that everything in the world, including water & aspirin pose a risk if used inappropriately?nnThe idea that marijuana use will lower moral & ethical standards is not a new idea, and one which was promoted by many of the industrial and political interests active in implementing laws which bar it’s possession & use, including industrial hemp forms. I urge you to take the “Anslinger Challenge”, or see if you can concur with all or any of the sentiments expressed by the original head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics in regards to marijuana.nhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXU0a9FdF4wnnThat the idea of marijuana re-legalization so scares you is not that surprising to me, considering most of our ingrained perception of the plant comes from Harry Anslinger who reported “There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos, and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz, and swing, result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers, and any others.u201dnnIt’s just disappointing to me that so many years later, you can’t see through the smoke screen. (pun intended)nnMy family includes people who have abused alcohol to the point of dependence & life shattering actions. Does that mean I believe alcohol should be outlawed for adult consumption? No, because I know my history & I understand that prohibition of something does not preclude those who want a substance from obtaining it. Maybe your family doesn’t want to hear that too much aspirin can be fatal, but it doesn’t change the fact that it is. I’m impressed by your super-sociological ability to determine what all families in MLT are interested in hearing about. What do you do to make sure nobody else steal your special powers of perception?nnI will repeat myself, that these two guys do not impress me, in either their knowledge of the legal hurdles of establishing a medicinal marijuana store for deserving patients or their understanding of the need for certain practices & procedures to ensure safe and appropriate medicine for said patients. Perhaps their attempt will encourage more capable & determined individuals either in our town or elsewhere.nnMy main point was that our current laws are ineffective at allowing medical research of any kind, providing medicine to sick the sick and dying, & preventing access by children.nnIn case you can’t tell from my comments, my position is as an anti-prohibitionist for all drugs, and I have seen much suffering & destruction due to our complex & irrational relationship with drugs. This does not translate to “treat all drugs the same, free for all”, but to regulate & control drugs based on their danger to the user & society. If you compare the very quantifiable intoxication level required to induce death, it is clear that alcohol is possibly lethal where marijuana is not. (It takes only 10 times the intoxicating amount of alcohol to cause death, with marijuana you would need to take 1000 times the intoxicating amount, which is physically impossible.)nnBarring adults from having access to marijuana hasn’t shown to be helpful in decreasing hard drug deaths & dependence, nor in discouraging marijuana use in general, or in teens specifically. Even the Nixon administrations commission to study the impact of marijuana prohibition laws came to the conclusion that the criminalization of adult use was not only ineffective at decreasing abuse & access to kids, but was counterproductive.nnI’m not making it up, you can read it yourself. Nixon found these findings to be counterproductive himself, to his goals of controlling & arresting “hippies, jews & uppity niggers” and buried it. It is in the public record, though, as well as the recordings of his dissatisfaction with the commission’s conclusions.nnIf you call my knowledge of this history & my subsequent outrage to be embarrassing and it moves you to assume I must be a chech & chong stoner, then that is your position. Personally, I think you’re wrong.nnYour reactionary fear is what is keeping marijuana in the hands of vicious murderous cartels who don’t care if they destroy our public lands or sell to kids that don’t know the risks involved. Nice warm blanket of fear & ignorance you have there.nnTo find out why cops, prosecutors, judges, prison guards & other law enforcement personnel have moved me to come to my position in regards to drug legalization, I urge you to investigate the group Law Enforcement Against Prohibition.nhttp://leap.cc/cms/index.php?name=Content&pid=2

  6. I'm not sure what scares me more, the thought of a marijuana store in Mountlake Terrace, or the knowledge that someone can actually write the above statement and believe the twisted 'facts'. Before spewing off statistics, you should probably convey them in a context that is consistent and accurate.

  7. whoah! Well my initial thought is from the show Weeds… I would say something is wrong if it is profitable enough to open an actual store. Like birth control, whether you agree with it or not, it should be dispensed at the pharmacy if it is medical, right?

  8. Is it so hard for you to wrap your mind around the concept that everything in the world, including water & aspirin pose a risk if used inappropriately?The idea that marijuana use will lower moral & ethical standards is not a new idea, and one which was promoted by many of the industrial and political interests active in implementing laws which bar it's possession & use, including industrial hemp forms. I urge you to take the “Anslinger Challenge”, or see if you can concur with all or any of the sentiments expressed by the original head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics in regards to marijuana.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXU0a9FdF4wThat the idea of marijuana re-legalization so scares you is not that surprising to me, considering most of our ingrained perception of the plant comes from Harry Anslinger who reported “There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos, and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz, and swing, result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers, and any others.”It's just disappointing to me that so many years later, you can't see through the smoke screen. (pun intended)My family includes people who have abused alcohol to the point of dependence & life shattering actions. Does that mean I believe alcohol should be outlawed for adult consumption? No, because I know my history & I understand that prohibition of something does not preclude those who want a substance from obtaining it. Maybe your family doesn't want to hear that too much aspirin can be fatal, but it doesn't change the fact that it is. I'm impressed by your super-sociological ability to determine what all families in MLT are interested in hearing about. What do you do to make sure nobody else steal your special powers of perception?I will repeat myself, that these two guys do not impress me, in either their knowledge of the legal hurdles of establishing a medicinal marijuana store for deserving patients or their understanding of the need for certain practices & procedures to ensure safe and appropriate medicine for said patients. Perhaps their attempt will encourage more capable & determined individuals either in our town or elsewhere.My main point was that our current laws are ineffective at allowing medical research of any kind, providing medicine to sick the sick and dying, & preventing access by children.In case you can't tell from my comments, my position is as an anti-prohibitionist for all drugs, and I have seen much suffering & destruction due to our complex & irrational relationship with drugs. This does not translate to “treat all drugs the same, free for all”, but to regulate & control drugs based on their danger to the user & society. If you compare the very quantifiable intoxication level required to induce death, it is clear that alcohol is possibly lethal where marijuana is not. (It takes only 10 times the intoxicating amount of alcohol to cause death, with marijuana you would need to take 1000 times the intoxicating amount, which is physically impossible.)Barring adults from having access to marijuana hasn't shown to be helpful in decreasing hard drug deaths & dependence, nor in discouraging marijuana use in general, or in teens specifically. Even the Nixon administrations commission to study the impact of marijuana prohibition laws came to the conclusion that the criminalization of adult use was not only ineffective at decreasing abuse & access to kids, but was counterproductive.I'm not making it up, you can read it yourself. Nixon found these findings to be counterproductive himself, to his goals of controlling & arresting “hippies, jews & uppity niggers” and buried it. It is in the public record, though, as well as the recordings of his dissatisfaction with the commission's conclusions.If you call my knowledge of this history & my subsequent outrage to be embarrassing and it moves you to assume I must be a chech & chong stoner, then that is your position. Personally, I think you're wrong.Your reactionary fear is what is keeping marijuana in the hands of vicious murderous cartels who don't care if they destroy our public lands or sell to kids that don't know the risks involved. Nice warm blanket of fear & ignorance you have there.To find out why cops, prosecutors, judges, prison guards & other law enforcement personnel have moved me to come to my position in regards to drug legalization, I urge you to investigate the group Law Enforcement Against Prohibition.http://leap.cc/cms/index.php?name=Content&pid=2

  9. Please illustrate how you believe the statistics I cited were inconsistent, inaccurate or out of context.I was referring to the specific risk of death from ingesting a drug.There are many deaths in this country due to marijuana prohibition, including many law enforcement officers & innocent non-drug users like 92 year old Kathryn Johnston, but there are no recorded deaths from ingesting the drug alone. Not last year. Not ever. Please, if you have information which refutes this statement, I am very curious to know about it.Unlike aspirin, which can kill you if you simply take too much of it.

  10. These guys are no Marc Emery (finally got a chance to see the actual video, not just read the article, and their standards for operation are pretty in my opinion)… but, whatever engages us in conversation.;)I know Rick Steves is from Edmonds, not MLT, but if you haven't yet seen his documercial produced with the Washington State ACLU, “Marijuana: It's Time for a Conversation” it is very informative & put a lot of this debate in perspective for me & others who are fed up with the failure of the War on Drugs to attain any of it's stated goals.You can watch it for free here:http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1156862…There is also a very informative & in-depth report, “The Consequences and Costs of Marijuana Prohibition,” which was produced by Katherine Beckett and Steve Herbert, associate professors in the University of Washington's Law, Societies, and Justice Program.http://www.aclu-wa.org/detail.cfm?id=1014Beckett and Herbert found that enforcing marijuana laws consumes major portions of government budgets. (You think they included our $800,000 payout for violating Sergeant Wender's freedom of speech rights in their computations?)Knowledge is power & you can't battle the problem of drug use & abuse without facing reality.

  11. whoah! Well my initial thought is from the show Weeds… I would say something is wrong if it is profitable enough to open an actual store. Like birth control, whether you agree with it or not, it should be dispensed at the pharmacy if it is medical, right?

  12. These guys are no Marc Emery (finally got a chance to see the actual video, not just read the article, and their standards for operation are pretty in my opinion)… but, whatever engages us in conversation.nn;)nnI know Rick Steves is from Edmonds, not MLT, but if you haven’t yet seen his documercial produced with the Washington State ACLU, “Marijuana: It’s Time for a Conversation” it is very informative & put a lot of this debate in perspective for me & others who are fed up with the failure of the War on Drugs to attain any of it’s stated goals.nnYou can watch it for free here:nhttp://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1156862632967780733&ei=VUnWSqPyOYGeqQOm7q2RCg&q=it%27s+time+for+a+conversation&hl=en&client=firefox-a#nnThere is also a very informative & in-depth report, “The Consequences and Costs of Marijuana Prohibition,” which was produced by Katherine Beckett and Steve Herbert, associate professors in the University of Washington’s Law, Societies, and Justice Program.nhttp://www.aclu-wa.org/detail.cfm?id=1014nnBeckett and Herbert found that enforcing marijuana laws consumes major portions of government budgets. (You think they included our $800,000 payout for violating Sergeant Wender’s freedom of speech rights in their computations?)nnKnowledge is power & you can’t battle the problem of drug use & abuse without facing reality.

  13. I'm very thankful, for your children & your sake, that they did not have their lives ruined by their experimentation, because they were never caught & forced into the criminal justice system which could affect them for the rest of their lives.If you interpreted my position to be “give up on the drug problem” then I'm afraid I may have been less clear than I intended. To defend the freedom of adults to use drugs is not to advocate the use of drugs, nor a lack of pragmatic regulation. I am sorry if I was not more clear in my post. I thank you for your thoughtful response, and hope that you never have to see the blood & waste that the militarization and encroachment of basic civil rights that our battle with drugs has engendered.That is all.

    • I’m very thankful, for your children & your sake, that they did not have their lives ruined by their experimentation, because they were never caught & forced into the criminal justice system which could affect them for the rest of their lives.nnIf you interpreted my position to be “give up on the drug problem” then I’m afraid I may have been less clear than I intended. To defend the freedom of adults to use drugs is not to advocate the use of drugs, nor a lack of pragmatic regulation. I am sorry if I was not more clear in my post. I thank you for your thoughtful response, and hope that you never have to see the blood & waste that the militarization and encroachment of basic civil rights that our battle with drugs has engendered.nnThat is all.

        • Why did your comments disappear? :-
          nThere are many resources I could point to. It’s actually a little overwhelming to try to think of the information available to you that I would recommend, without knowledge of what you’re already familiar with in regards to the drug policy reform movement.nnThe main thing I want to say is, the best solution would be to eradicate the market for illegal drugs from the human condition. Short of suddenly finding a magical unicorn that grants wishes, this best option is out of reach in reality.nnA lower drug use society is an attainable goal but it is only attainable if we deal with the evidence and world as it really is, not as we wish it to be.nnThen what? The main thing is Harm Reduction. Does prohibition & criminalization reduce the harm caused to the user & society by drug use & abuse?nnWell, think about it. I don’t feel compelled to give you my answer, since I’m sure you already have figured out my perspective.nnIs arrest rate increase, or seizure of drugs a good indication of the Drug War’s success? Why or why not?nnThere are a few great blogs which focus on this issue I would recommend without hesitation, which include:nhttp://copssaylegalize.blogspot.com/nhttp://www.copinthehood.com/nhttp://stopthedrugwar.org/homennhttp://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/ is a great resource site.nnI did not intend to offend, or patronize you by my responses. As you can tell, this is something I have a breadth of knowledge & passion for, and I am more than happy to engage in conversation, protest & speak to my representatives when possible. I do not work on drug policy full time, bu I did not come to be an anti-prohibitionist lightly, and I empathize with your, and many others’, resistance to such a concept & strategy for tackling our problems with drugs.nnThe argument and first hand experience that LEAP (Law Enforcement Against Prohibition) has exposed me to has a large part to do with why I feel the way I do about drugs & our current system for regulation (or lack there-of). My own experience with drugs, alcohol & addiction with those in my life has also lead me to a perspective that sees little to no value in continuing a strategy which has failed to reduce the availability of dangerous drugs or the harm they cause.nnYou can see a LEAP presentation here:nhttp://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4193106910171759777&ei=GsPXSuGbFI-EqQPwrMTDCQ&q=law+enforcement+against+prohibition&hl=en&client=firefox-a#nn”The prestige of government has undoubtedly been lowered considerably by the Prohibition law. For nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced. It is an open secret that the dangerous increase of crime in this country is closely connected with this.”nAlbert EinsteinnnHe was, of course, referring to the prohibition law regarding alcohol, but this sentiment can be applied to our current drug laws, in my opinion. I think we bring unnecessary doubt & mistrust on our peace officers & laws which serve to protect the public when we maintain laws which violate such essential choices of life, regarding what to ingest or not. nIt is a slippery slope. Once the government can tell you what you MUST NOT put in your own body, I don’t think we’re far from rationalizing what you MUST ingest. To me, that idea is very frightening.nnI am currently reading a very enlightening non-fiction book: “Marijuana: A History” and have come to appreciate the long-maligned plant in a new way, with regards to our historical, ancient & diverse relationship with it. I recommend it. πŸ™‚

  14. Why did your comments disappear? :-There are many resources I could point to. It's actually a little overwhelming to try to think of the information available to you that I would recommend, without knowledge of what you're already familiar with in regards to the drug policy reform movement.The main thing I want to say is, the best solution would be to eradicate the market for illegal drugs from the human condition. Short of suddenly finding a magical unicorn that grants wishes, this best option is out of reach in reality.A lower drug use society is an attainable goal but it is only attainable if we deal with the evidence and world as it really is, not as we wish it to be.Then what? The main thing is Harm Reduction. Does prohibition & criminalization reduce the harm caused to the user & society by drug use & abuse?Well, think about it. I don't feel compelled to give you my answer, since I'm sure you already have figured out my perspective.Is arrest rate increase, or seizure of drugs a good indication of the Drug War's success? Why or why not?There are a few great blogs which focus on this issue I would recommend without hesitation, which include:http://copssaylegalize.blogspot.com/http://www.copinthehood.com/http://stopthedrugwar.org/homehttp://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/ is a great resource site.I did not intend to offend, or patronize you by my responses. As you can tell, this is something I have a breadth of knowledge & passion for, and I am more than happy to engage in conversation, protest & speak to my representatives when possible. I do not work on drug policy full time, bu I did not come to be an anti-prohibitionist lightly, and I empathize with your, and many others', resistance to such a concept & strategy for tackling our problems with drugs.The argument and first hand experience that LEAP (Law Enforcement Against Prohibition) has exposed me to has a large part to do with why I feel the way I do about drugs & our current system for regulation (or lack there-of). My own experience with drugs, alcohol & addiction with those in my life has also lead me to a perspective that sees little to no value in continuing a strategy which has failed to reduce the availability of dangerous drugs or the harm they cause.You can see a LEAP presentation here:http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-419310…“The prestige of government has undoubtedly been lowered considerably by the Prohibition law. For nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced. It is an open secret that the dangerous increase of crime in this country is closely connected with this.”Albert EinsteinHe was, of course, referring to the prohibition law regarding alcohol, but this sentiment can be applied to our current drug laws, in my opinion. I think we bring unnecessary doubt & mistrust on our peace officers & laws which serve to protect the public when we maintain laws which violate such essential choices of life, regarding what to ingest or not. It is a slippery slope. Once the government can tell you what you MUST NOT put in your own body, I don't think we're far from rationalizing what you MUST ingest. To me, that idea is very frightening.I am currently reading a very enlightening non-fiction book: “Marijuana: A History” and have come to appreciate the long-maligned plant in a new way, with regards to our historical, ancient & diverse relationship with it. I recommend it. πŸ™‚

  15. I am WA state medical marijauna prescription holder. I hope for the sake of those who have a hard time getting the medication this could be a great option. Although street value is around $40 for an eight ounce or $280 per once. If this dispensary was anymore than street value I likely would not use it simply for economic reasons. I would definitely go to do quality comparisons for sure but if the price is too high this business will fail in my opinion. Quality in this state is among the highest in the world including Holland.I Wish this business the best of luck but urge everyone not to trust state and federal laws, until definitions have been made very clear.

  16. I am WA state medical marijauna prescription holder. I hope for the sake of those who have a hard time getting the medication this could be a great option. Although street value is around $40 for an eight ounce or $280 per once. If this dispensary was anymore than street value I likely would not use it simply for economic reasons. I would definitely go to do quality comparisons for sure but if the price is too high this business will fail in my opinion. Quality in this state is among the highest in the world including Holland.I Wish this business the best of luck but urge everyone not to trust state and federal laws, until definitions have been made very clear.

  17. The U.S. Department of Social and Health Services' (DSHS) DAWN program, through the Office of Applied Studies (OAS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health ServicesAdministration (SAMHSA), and by RTI International (a trade name of Research Triangle Institute, under contract number 280-03-2602, noted 18 marijuana related deaths in 2007 for the Seattle-Tacoma/Pierce County area alone. DAWN defines a death in this category as: “any death reviewed by an ME/C that was related to recent drug use”Look it up. And don't rely on 'drugwarfacts.com' for your information. That's like relying on FOX news for bypartisan political news.https://dawninfo.samhsa.gov/default.asp

  18. Funny, I thought there already was a weed shop on 99. It's the hydroponics store. Been in there once looking for gardening supplies and if the other patrons were flower or veggie gardeners, I'll eat my hat!

  19. Funny, I thought there already was a weed shop on 99. It’s the hydroponics store. Been in there once looking for gardening supplies and if the other patrons were flower or veggie gardeners, I’ll eat my hat!

  20. No deaths in which the toxicology report returned a positive result for marijuana were single-drug deaths: https://dawninfo.samhsa.gov/files/ME2007/State-… furthermore, since marijuana's inactive metabolites remain detectable much longer than any other drug or alcohol, a positive test result doesn't tell us whether the marijuana was ingested minutes, hours, days, or even weeks before the death. Look it up.

  21. First, your link doesn't work, here's the correct one: https://dawninfo.samhsa.gov/files/ME2007/State-… (I think the post had a trailing ; on it)Second, you make a statement about the stats, but fail to indicate its relevance. So, because no one DIRECTLY died from ingesting marijuana, it's okay? According to the same document, no one DIRECTLY died from hallucinogens or benzodiazepines… so, they aren't dangerous? Additionally, and this is where it's interesting, the document also listed ZERO for single use drug deaths for “Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents”… also known as aspirin. Thank you for pointing this out!Third, yes, you're right, and the metabolic rate for all drugs is known and measurable, to the point of knowing last ingestion of said drug at time of measure. Because we know how each drug is metabolized in the system, and level of said drug in the system can lead to a fairly good window of last ingestion, we can rule out cause of death being related to drug if beyond the point of conscious, physical and mental impairment.All that being said, I'm not here to argue whether drugs are good or bad or what can kill you and what can't. I simply don't want a retail store in my neighborhood that sells marijuana, legal or not, unless it's run in a manner that's consistent across the county and the state. I'm not saying I'm totally against the idea, just the idea of being the first, in this type of residential neighborhood, and with the type of people that were attempting this.

  22. You have people in your neighborhood selling marijuana, whether you want them to be or not. Right now.Until we face facts and deal with our problems with drug abuse as they really are, and not how we would like them to be, we are mandating criminality, police corruption, lives ruined over legal repercussions, and allowing drug dealers to decide who should & shouldn't have access to substances, adults or not.As far as legalization goes, as a parent, I ask myself, “what are the dangers to teens?” And, what are the likely scenarios? If pot is still illegal to anyone under 21, how will teens get it? I think the most likely scenario is the same as beer and cigarettes. Older brothers and sisters, with IDs, will legally buy packaged marijuana cigarettes at gas stations and share them with younger ones on Friday night parties. As a parent, I ask myself, “how do I feel about this?” And… after a little thought, I actually feel better knowing my child is with trusted friends, ingesting measured substances than on a corner at night buying an illegal substance from a stranger.Reefer madness is alive & well, and the “not in my backyard” mentality only prolongs the harm that prohibition brings to our community. I don't know these guys, or what “kind of people they are” beyond what the article has stated, but I support anybody who brings attention to our counterproductive and asinine policies. Hooray for them speaking out and taking action to point out how ludicrous our policies are! Success or not for their immediate adventure, at least they have garnered a discussion in our community.You want to eradicate cannabis from the earth? You might as well set out to rid the planet of dandelions. In the mean time, understanding the history behind these laws is essential to fixing the problems associated with them.The city of MLT has already shelled out hundreds of thousands of dollars firing a skilled & intelligent officer because he chose to speak out on the failure of the war on drug users… how much more needless death & crime do we need to see, and how much more money do we need to pay out before we can deal with the reality of drug use constructively, instead of in denial?

  23. When smoked, marijuana releases the brain's pleasure chemical, dopamine, into its system, producing an euphoric high. This affects the areas of the brain that also respond to food, sleep and drink, which is why users often have the “munchies” and seem relaxed. This is misleading in a sense because the respiratory and circulatory systems actually speed up. Breathing becomes more labored and the heart works harder. Chronic use makes the user very susceptible to health problems like heart attacks, strokes and cancer of the lungs and throat.Like any drug that affects the mind and body, marijuana can become addicting as the body becomes dependent on it. The brain adapts to the stimulation of its pleasure centers and can rewire itself after repeated reinforcement. The withdrawal symptoms of irritability or sleeplessness can occur if the user quits taking the drug. Those who are dependent and have tried to quit without help often find difficulty in doing so for any significant length of time, and will pick up again.Another characteristic of continued marijuana use is the diminishing effects of the euphoria and the increasing consequences of the side effects. Effects on the brain include:Memory problemsLearning difficultiesLack of concentrationLoss of coordinationIncreased paranoiaIncreased fearEmotional isolationLessens judgment , you're right the plant itself can't be blamed for the death of anyone just a slight problem with all the above but hey nobody died right, you've got to be kidding me , with all those symptoms or side affects you might as well be!

  24. First off , Let's be honest here , With the legalize all drugs mission you are on , I can't imagine you being a parent so unless you are a devoted parent it would be hard for me as to see things on the same wave length. You expressed too much enthusiasm for the men in this ridiculous business venture of theirs , no one has said that the clinics should not be allowed to operate as a clinic for medical marijuana patients. Medical marijuana has been said to be a medication legal to use with a prescription as I know it , the law requires all prescriptions to be handled by a 'licensed pharmacist'! What you are actually trying to convince people of is to let drug dealers move into neighborhoods and just be silent about it because they are already in neighborhoods ? What ? Do you think people chose to have them there ? Just vote YES cause it's already there anyways, I hope for the sake of all mankind you are NOT a parent! I am in and out of schools all week around parents at after school programs , I must say I have been fortunate to have never encountered a parent that shares the same views as yourself on drugs.You have stated you do not know the men mentioned , leads one to ponder the truth in that . “A mother is never alone in her thoughts , A mother must always think twice , one for her herself and once for her child”. It's no Albert Einstein quote but it's one I'm extremely fond of and live by πŸ™‚

  25. Hallucinogens : ZERO deaths in 2006 or 2007 , we should legalize them too right ? No one died , thanks Alison for the partial link , Mark for the correction to that link

  26. Oh, I do love a good “no true Scotsman” argument. What a fantastic way to discredit my position without even contemplating it for yourself.No good parent could possibly take an objective look at our current system of failed prohibition & speak out against what they see? They couldn't find the War on Drugs to be a negative, rather than a positive influence on their children?Seriously, the audacity of such a generalization is so completely predictable it would be funny if it weren't so destructive and dehumanizing. Former Seattle police chief Norm Stamper is a father & grandfather who speaks out as a prominent leader of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition. He's written a great deal about his first hand experiences with enforcing drug laws… he is not only in favor of legalizing marijuana, but all drugs as well.So, you haven't met any other parents that are outspoken with their disgust for the War on Drugs. Have you asked?Advocating for the legalization and control of illicit drugs does not demand one to advocate they're use. Advocating blanket prohibition demands that these dangerous substances be controlled by criminals and thugs.”Marijuana never kicks down your door in the middle of the night.Marijuana never locks up sick and dying people,does not suppress medical research,does not peek in bedroom windows.Even if one takes every reefer madness allegationof the prohibitionists at face value,marijuana prohibition has done far more harmto far more people than marijuana ever could.” William F. BuckleyCheck out the link to see Republican MOTHER (omg, for real? like, why hasn't CPS totally been to take her kids?) express her perspective on this contentious issue. πŸ˜‰

  27. One woman's opinion is all that link provided , just as you & I have done here. What part of ” I am in & out of schools all week , talking to many families” did you not comprehend ? You are entitled to your opinion ,there's no need to get so angry , we can agree to disagree.Good luck to you and your friends that are trying to open this mart , the ones you have so fiercely backed with such ridiculous opinionated links πŸ™‚

  28. I don't know those guys beyond the article here, let alone call them friends. I like your further attempt to prove me guilty by association with an incorrect hunch. You also express a lack of understanding of the law since doctors do not actually prescribe Medical Marijuana, because federal law precludes them from doing so. They can only “recommend” a patient will benefit from it. WA state does not have a system for medical marijuana. The only thing our law does is protect patients & their caregivers from prosecution by giving them a positive defense WHEN they're arrested. It doesn't stop cops from arresting sick people over their choice of medicine, and it doesn't facilitate regulatory standards of any kind beyond limits of what amount of medicine qualifies for a positive defense or not.From the information available, these guys appear to be quite inept, compared to those who have successfully established dispensary models in other states, and I state quite clearly that I support their efforts only because I support anybody who brings attention to our counterproductive policies regarding drugs.They are no Norm Stamper, Rick Steves or former MLT Sergeant Jonathan Wender in reputation or authority on the matter… but at least they're actions have brought the questions of the effectiveness of blanket prohibition into the light.You ASSume that I know them, or have a personal interest in their venture. But you're wrong. Philosophical support of their cause (vs their endeavor), and finding value in using the opportunity of a community forum to express that position is possible without intimate knowledge of these individuals.It is possible to be an active, supportive & involved parent AND be disgusted by the War on Drugs at the same time. So disgusted that staying silent and muzzled by the threats & intimidation of prohibitionist zealots no longer seems like an option. That is why I cited Jessica Corry & Norm Stamper as public figures who are examples of what you can't seem to comprehend: good parents can support drug prohibition reform. Jessica Corry cites a number of verifiable date & facts to support her opinion. She expresses the position of pragmatic and drug policy reform in a straight-forward, constitutional based fashion which is based on protecting kids from criminals & thugs. Do you talk about drug policy on a regular basis with parents? Not just drug use/abuse, but macro drug policy? And you feel like a parent who may support legalization reform but is not an active advocate is likely to voice that position in a school setting? LOL:D

  29. The Drug Free America Foundation stated in its “Myths About the Drug War” posted on its web site “Under a legalization scenario, a black market for drugs would still exist. If drugs were legal for those over 18 or 21, there would be a market for everyone under that age. People under the age of 21 consume the majority of illegal drugs, and so an illegal market and organized crime to supply it would remain—along with the organized crime that profits from it. After Prohibition ended, did the organized crime in our country go down? No. It continues today in a variety of other criminal enterprises. Legalization would not put the cartels out of business; cartels would simply look to other illegal endeavors…. While 'government drugs' could conceivably be priced low enough to eliminate competition, perhaps by having taxpayers subsidize them to discourage a black market, the combination of low price and wide availability would result in greater consumption, and consequently increased addiction. Increased consumption and addiction lead to drug-related crime. This government regulation argument ignores the dangerously addictive nature of drugs. And finally, under a legalization scenario, a black market for drugs would still exist. If drugs were legal for those over 18 or 21, there would be a market for everyone under that age –a faction of the population that can be targeted by those looking to profit from the sale of drugs.” – Drug Free America Foundation ——————————————————————————–Charles D. Mabry, MD, Assistant Professor at the College of Medicine at the University of Arkansas, wrote an article titled “Physicians and the War on Drugs: The Case Against Legalization” published in the Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons that:”Does making addictive drugs illegal work? Cocaine and potent narcotics were freely sold in America until the first two decades of the 20th century, and the number of patients addicted dropped sharply once availability was curtailed…. More recently, several European countries have experimented with various attempts to legalize or decriminalize some illegal drugs. These experiments have resulted in a rise in the number of drug-addicted patients and a corresponding increase in the crime rate…. The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse has stated the situation concerning illicit drugs in this country most eloquently: 'Drugs are not a threat to American society because they are illegal; they are illegal because they are a threat to American society.'… There is another stark reality: In some cases, the only thing that forces someone who is addicted to drugs and spiraling out of control into therapy is the threat (or reality) of incarceration. Do away with laws prohibiting sale of these drugs, and you do away with the only hope of help for so many people who are addicted but just can’t stop themselves.” – Charles D. Mabry, MD ——————————————————————————–Ann Coulter, JD, author, wrote in her article “Don't Do Drug Legalization” for Townhall.com that:”The most superficially appealing argument for drug legalization is that people should be allowed to do what they want with their own bodies, even if it ruins their lives. Except that's not true. Back on Earth, see, we live in a country that will not allow people to live with their own stupid decisions. Ann has to pay for their stupid decisions. 'We' have to 'invest' in 'our' future by supporting people who freely choose to inject drugs in their own bodies and then become incapable of holding jobs, obtaining housing and taking care of their children. So it's not really quite accurate to say drugs hurt no one but the user, at least until we've repealed the welfare state…. Drugs enslave people. So do cigarettes and alcohol, the drug legalizers say….. Assume alcohol and cigarettes induce dependency, ruin lives, cause disease, depression, countless traffic injuries and fatalities, and increase the incidence of homicide and suicide. This is supposed to be an argument for legalizing another drug like them?” http://www.stoptheaclu.com/2005/08/11/aclu-want

  30. Legalization & control is not an option because there will always be a black market for kids? Except there is alcohol & tobacco… and there IS a black market for underage kids. I support enforcing laws which limit this black market, and I would support the same laws which protect kids from other drugs if they became regulated for an adult market. Education is also a key component of discouraging experimentation. HONEST, science-based education is the key, though.You commit a crime against another person or their property because you were on drugs? That's still a crime. You neglect your kids? Still a crime. Provide drugs to kids w/o a doctor's prescription for medical necessity? Still a crime. Commit any offense against another person or property? Still a crime!Jaycee Lee Dugard was kidnapped & held captive by Phillip Garrido because he was let out of prison for an earlier kidnapping & assault BECAUSE he claimed being on drugs at the time made him commit his previous crime. No, you know what. That's not okay. He knew what he was doing, he knew that if he took drugs he would kidnap & rape a woman in a storage container, and being on drugs is no excuse for such depraved indifference to human life. Since the inception of the Bureau of Narcotics, criminals have used “I was high” to receive leniency. I don't think that's right at all. If you knowingly take drugs, and as a result of your impaired state commit a crime, you are just as culpable as if you were sober… but our current system of laws REWARDS drug use by violent criminals, and offers them an avenue to excuse their behavior.**The USA spends about 300 Billion more dollars every year fighting the war on drugs than we spend on fighting the growing illicit trade of human beings.****Half of our veterans in prison right now are there for drug charges.****Marijuana is easier for teens to get than alcohol or tobacco.****Washington state has seen Rx drug deaths surpass MVA deaths in the last year.**All drugs are dangerous if used incorrectly, and use by underage kids is only made more accessible by forcing them onto the black market.The Drug Free America Foundation is funded by donations from many organizations… their goal is not to reduce drug use & abuse, but to “oppose ballot initiatives that would reduce criminal penalties on illegal drugs”That's a pretty clear mandate, which demands more prison inmates, stiffer penalties for sick people & to focus law enforcement resources on drug crimes. We have the largest prison inmate population in the world & it continues to grow. Is it because Americans are inherently evil, weak or criminally insane, more so than the rest of the world?hawks2win, and anyone else who says they don't support “legalizing drugs” that doesn't support re-criminalizing alcohol are hypocrites. Plain & simple. A drug is a drug is a drug. At least if you supported prohibition of alcohol, your position would be consistent.Parenting your child to stay away from drugs is a good thing, and nobody, especially Law Enforcement Against Prohibition is saying that we should just throw the flood gates open. The bottom line is our system for controlling drugs is broken, people are suffering & dying. Even people who have nothing to do with any drugs have been killed in the name of the drug war. And all the while, drug cartels & dealers are making more money than we could even dream of funding into the fight against them.Illegal drug dealers like prohibition. They LOVE that you're so scared to educate and prepare your child for a paradigm where they do not control the flow of drug supplies to our population. Your fear, your denial and your blind allegiance to those working to maintain the failed status quo is exactly what makes illegal drugs such a profitable business.Drugs make their way into the highest security prisons in our nation, where all semblance of personal space and privacy are stripped away from inmates. How on earth do you expect to keep them away from people who want them in a free society?The truth is that we CAN'T. There is no way to rid the world & the human condition of the urge to use & abuse drugs 100%. Well, short of obliterating the human race or finding a magical unicorn that grants wishes. Neither of those seem like viable plans, and since we've seen that as arrests & seizures increase, so does consumption, then maybe we should consider alternatives to the path we've taken for the past 75 years?No?You must be smoking crack.

  31. I must be smoking crack ? Well that's mature but to be expected when coming from someone wanting to legalize ALL drugs..LOL I've read the comments here all of them and if I'm not mistaken you are one of many people.I'd have to agree with nonames and ASSume you have personal interest in this topic ;D http://www.stoptheaclu.com/2005/08/11/aclu-want… Good luck with your mart πŸ˜›

  32. What happens when you assume?You make an ASS out of U & Me!:DI only have a personal interest because I know people who suffer from MS & other debilitating disorders which are aided by marijuana. I have seen their pain & I have been relayed the risks of obtaining their medicine through black market means. They have explained to me the cost, energy and danger of growing their own, both in terms of legal prosecution & being victims of criminals who are after their medicine. I have also seen the waste of our resources by firing upstanding police officers like Sergeant Wender from our local force over his public support of drug policy reform. We also ended up paying out a 6 figure settlement for infringing his First Amendment right to freedom of speech. Local efficiency of resources, anyone?You've deluded yourselves into believing that I, or anyone else that holds my position of reform is in favor of drug abuse. I would be tempted to infer that you get a bit of a neurochemical high from your sadomoralist mantra. From this limited interaction, though, I wouldn't ASSume that without further evidence of an addiction to your sense of superiority. I like evidence… and facts.Drugs are a very serious public health dilemma, and making it a criminal justice issue where there are no other crimes committed has proven time & again to foster police corruption, gang violence & larger profits for criminals.But you're cool with that because it makes you FEEL better to believe that our public servants are risking their lives to police what an adult chooses to do with their own body. Even though it's easier for kids to get illegal drugs than alcohol, the idea of regulating them in a similar fashion to alcohol is somehow ridiculous?Like I said… unless you support re-criminalizing alcohol for adult consumption, you're a hypocrite. πŸ™‚

  33. Personally… I think your post makes an excellent point. Something with such powerful impact on the human system should be regulated, controlled & distributed only to adults with informed consent regarding the risks, and/or patients under the supervision of a trained medical physician when safer treatments are not available/effective.For instance, alcohol is not available to just anyone BECAUSE it's so dangerous to the human body. You need to be 21 or older to be able to buy it. There are stiff penalties for supplying it to a minor, and criminal charges for the purchaser and/or store which facilitates such transactions. Isn't it great that the dangerous drug of alcohol is not primarily in the domain of vicious & violent criminals?Alcohol may be the world's oldest known drug. Fermented grain, fruit juice and honey have been used to make alcohol (ethyl alcohol or ethanol) for thousands of years. The production of products containing alcohol has become big business in today's society and the consumption and abuse of alcohol has become a major public health problem. Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant. It acts at many sites, including the reticular formation, spinal cord, cerebellum and cerebral cortex, and on many neurotransmitter systems. Alcohol is a very small molecule and is soluble in “lipid” and water solutions. Because of these properties, alcohol gets into the bloodstream very easily and also crosses the blood brain barrier. Some of the neurochemical effects of alcohol are: * Increased turnover of norepinephrine and dopamine * Decreased transmission in acetylcholine systems * Increased transmission in GABA systems * Increased production of beta-endorphin in the hypothalamus Chronic drinking can lead to dependence and addiction to alcohol and to additional neurological problems. Typical symptoms of withholding alcohol from someone who is addicted to it are shaking (tremors), sleep problems and nausea. More severe withdrawal symptoms include hallucinations and even seizures.Chronic alcohol use can: * Damage the frontal lobes of the brain * Cause an overall reduction in brain size and increase in the size of the ventricles * Lead to alcoholism (addiction to alcohol) and result in tolerance to the effects of alcohol and variety of health problems * Cause a vitamin deficiency. Because the digestion system of alcoholics is unable to absorb vitamin B-1 (thiamine), a syndrome known as “Wernicke's Encephalopathy” may develop. This syndrome is characterized by impaired memory, confusion and lack of coordination. Further deficiencies of thiamine can lead to “Korsakoff's Syndrome.” This disorder is characterized by amnesia, apathy and disorientation. Widespread disease of the brain is a feature of both Wernicke's and Korsakoff's Syndromes.The body responds to alcohol in stages, which correspond to an increase in Blood Alcohol Content (BAC): 1. Euphoria (BAC = 0.03 to 0.12 percent) * They become more self-confident or daring. * Their attention span shortens. * They may look flushed. * Their judgement is not as good — they may say the first thought that comes to mind, rather than an appropriate comment for the given situation. * They have trouble with fine movements, such as writing or signing their name. 2. Excitement (BAC = 0.09 to 0.25 percent) * They become sleepy. * They have trouble understanding or remembering things (even recent events). * They do not react to situations as quickly (if they spill a drink they may just stare at it). * Their body movements are uncoordinated. * They begin to lose their balance easily. * Their vision becomes blurry. * They may have trouble sensing things (hearing, tasting, feeling, etc.). 3. Confusion (BAC = 0.18 to 0.30 percent) * They are confused — might not know where they are or what they are doing. * They are dizzy and may stagger. * They may be highly emotional — aggressive, withdrawn or overly affectionate. * They cannot see clearly. * They are sleepy. * They have slurred speech. * They have uncoordinated movements (trouble catching an object thrown to them). * They may not feel pain as readily as a sober person. 4. Stupor (BAC = 0.25 to 0.4 percent) * They can barely move at all. * They cannot respond to stimuli. * They cannot stand or walk. * They may vomit. * They may lapse in and out of consciousness. 5. Coma (BAC = 0.35 to 0.50 percent) * They are unconscious. * Their reflexes are depressed (i.e. their pupils do not respond appropriately to changes in light). * They feel cool (lower-than-normal body temperature). * Their breathing is slower and more shallow. * Their heart rate may slow. * They may die. 6. Death (BAC more than 0.50 percent) – The person usually stops breathing and dies.

  34. WOW! Guess everyone's allowed to speak their mind just as long as it is what you believe in right ? Maybe these are all FACTS in your mind but there are many different FACTS that can be used to back the theory why it is not in the best interest of the children or many people in FACT not to legalize drugs. As I have stated before I really hope you are not a parent not only because your delusional way of thinking way but also for the way you speak to another human being. Accusing someone of smoking crack , that you've never met! Just unbelievably sad! American Criminal Liberals Union…ACLU would that be you? You must be proud πŸ˜€ Good day to you & we are done here!

  35. who said anything about alcohol ? Let's talk about that , legalizing it didn't work out so well so why would we unleash another ? You have some issues my friend some serious issues!

  36. I'm infinitely entertained by your inability to take my crack joke with a sense of humor. It's a symbolic pejorative.Constitutional, social & fiscal conservatism is the basis for my position. I may concur with the ACLU in terms of personal liberty over one's own body, but that doesn't mean I represent them or endorse every single one of their positions. I certainly don't support leniency for criminals simply because they were on drugs when they committed their crimes, as I clearly stated in regards to the tragic case of Jaycee Lee Dugard. The ACLU didn't draft the US constitutional commitment to protect freedom of speech, and I don't see why you find no qualms with paying out hundreds of thousands of dollars so MLT can violate a decorated officer's right to express his position in regards to the drug war our police risk their lives to battle.I really hope you're preparing your children for the world as it really is, and not how you would prefer it to be in your fantasy world where 100% drug eradication is a possibility.Conservatives, Guns, and Drugsby Sheldon Richman, September 2002http://www.fff.org/freedom/fd0209e.asp“I said GOOD DAY, sir!”You crack me up. πŸ˜€

  37. You love being center of attention that is a FACT , that's what this has become , a link where Angie ,Alison, LEAP and so on (ALL being you) gets attention LOL Well indeed you have been noticed. Sad that MLT residents can not voice their opinion w/o you slandering them or degrading them with your “mature” snide remarks! You are answering for every single comment made here & YOU are the only one that matters right ? Throwing temper tantrums and accusing someone of smoking crack to get your own way & the unicorn crap because someone disagrees with you!??? Grow up! This childish so called debate has completely discusted me along with becoming boring in a hurry!

  38. I just want to say that I'm sorry if my playful way with language rubbed you the wrong way. I have personally seen much suffering in the name of maintaining our current policies, and feel strongly about the benefit of reform. I was mainly disturbed by the suggestion that someone was incapable of being a good parent because they found the war on drugs to be detrimental to society. I've already listed a few public figures which contradict this assertion, but I also took it as a personal attack.There is no need to fling personal attacks, and the “you're on crack” could be misinterpreted as an insult, rather than the unsuccessful attempt to add levity to the conversation that it was.I don't support illegal drug use. I don't support criminals. I don't support giving marijuana to children (with the exception of medical applications under the supervision of a doctor when no safer/better alternatives are available/effective)I support taking an analytical and pragmatic approach to an issue which we will probably never be rid of, at least not in my lifetime.It's a contentious issue, which has long been applied to the more general ideological & cultural battle of the left vs the right. It is not about ideology, but about dealing with a very serious problem (drug use) in the best way possible: reduce the harm drugs cause to the user & society.There are many and varied issues to consider, and every drug (legal or not) has individual risks and benefits which must be considered scientifically and objectively to formulate effective policy which helps 1)discourage people using drugs they don't medically need 2)stop/lower drug-related crime & 3)limit access to children.I really & sincerely hope that you never have to deal with a loved one losing their life or freedom because of drugs & the enforcement of their prohibition, but I also hope you understand that there are many of us who have seen much suffering & death in the name of our vain attempt at drug obliteration. Sacrificing civility because of the personal pain I have suffered over the experiences of people close to me is regrettable.

  39. Since I know people who benefit from medical marijuana, the idea of a local (& legal/qualified) alternative to them growing their own or finding it on the black market warms my cockles.Whether you feel all warm and fuzzy about dispensaries or not, the statistical evidence from areas where they've been established shows that crime rates decrease and other businesses around them flourish.With the exception of the occasional dispensary robbery, there is no evidence to show an increase in crime with direct connection to medical marijuana dispensariesAfter analyzing the numbers, it seems strange that anyone would try to say medical marijuana causes any crime. If anything, the data shows quite the opposite.http://www.safeaccessnow.org/article.php?id=4339http://www.scribd.com/doc/294793/Medical-Mariju…Just found on the more expansive Enterprise article about this that BUDS is taking the issue to the state Superior Court. They've also aligned themselves with Medical Marijuana Inc, a national corporation which offers “integrated tax oversight and collection solutions to local, state and federal governments, while also providing business management… Read More solutions to the industry that will confidently ensure compliance with local, state and federal regulations.”http://www.enterprisenewspapers.com/article/200…wow, apparently you can actually buy stock in MJNA (Medical Marijuana Inc.)I got a little curious & looked up some information about the historical application of cannabis. Some of it I knew already, but some of it was surprising. We knew George Washington grew hemp & all, but apparently there's evidence that he COULD have been cultivating cannabis for medicinal purposes. (considering his dental problems, and the fact that Thomas Jefferson grew poppies & colonial Americans were still bleeding each other for most diseases, I don't see this revelation that as terribly controversial… but damned if I don't appreciate the significance of our first president using what we now call marijuana.)Ancient History:http://www.druglibrary.net/schaffer/Library/stu…New World History:http://www.druglibrary.net/schaffer/Library/stu…Very interesting read… I'm wondering how I haven't found these before. I've read the Schaffer report which focuses on more current issues in the 1970s, but this historical context is fascinating. I am such a nerd. πŸ˜›

  40. Exactly what I was talking about . The spot light is on YOU again , I did not comment that I was against dispensaries . In fact I don't see a single post here that opposes such. You are way off track. We went from marjiuana marts to legalizing all drugs ,moved on to personal attacks and now back to the subject at hand…I don't know what you arguing for or against,battling yourself it seems. Thank you for the links & that's great you found some interesting issues about marijuana's history.

  41. “The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless yet be determined to make them otherwise.”– F. Scott Fitzgerald

  42. Since I know people who benefit from medical marijuana, the idea of a local (& legal/qualified) alternative to them growing their own or finding it on the black market warms my cockles.nnWhether you feel all warm and fuzzy about dispensaries or not, the statistical evidence from areas where they’ve been established shows that crime rates decrease and other businesses around them flourish.nnWith the exception of the occasional dispensary robbery, there is no evidence to show an increase in crime with direct connection to medical marijuana dispensariesnAfter analyzing the numbers, it seems strange that anyone would try to say medical marijuana causes any crime. If anything, the data shows quite the opposite.nnhttp://www.safeaccessnow.org/article.php?id=4339nnhttp://www.scribd.com/doc/294793/Medical-Marijuana-dispensariesnnJust found on the more expansive Enterprise article about this that BUDS is taking the issue to the state Superior Court. They’ve also aligned themselves with Medical Marijuana Inc, a national corporation which offers “integrated tax oversight and collection solutions to local, state and federal governments, while also providing business management… Read More solutions to the industry that will confidently ensure compliance with local, state and federal regulations.”nnhttp://www.enterprisenewspapers.com/article/20091028/ETP03/710289885/0/ETPZONEMC&template=ETPZoneMCartnnwow, apparently you can actually buy stock in MJNA (Medical Marijuana Inc.)nnI got a little curious & looked up some information about the historical application of cannabis. Some of it I knew already, but some of it was surprising. We knew George Washington grew hemp & all, but apparently there’s evidence that he COULD have been cultivating cannabis for medicinal purposes. (considering his dental problems, and the fact that Thomas Jefferson grew poppies & colonial Americans were still bleeding each other for most diseases, I don’t see this revelation that as terribly controversial… but damned if I don’t appreciate the significance of our first president using what we now call marijuana.)nnAncient History:nhttp://www.druglibrary.net/schaffer/Library/studies/cu/cu53.htmlnNew World History:nhttp://www.druglibrary.net/schaffer/Library/studies/cu/cu54.htmlnnVery interesting read… I’m wondering how I haven’t found these before. I’ve read the Schaffer report which focuses on more current issues in the 1970s, but this historical context is fascinating. I am such a nerd. πŸ˜›

    • Exactly what I was talking about . The spot light is on YOU again , I did not comment that I was against dispensaries . In fact I don’t see a single post here that opposes such. You are way off track. We went from marjiuana marts to legalizing all drugs ,moved on to personal attacks and now back to the subject at hand…I don’t know what you arguing for or against,battling yourself it seems. Thank you for the links & that’s great you found some interesting issues about marijuana’s history.

      • “The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless yet be determined to make them otherwise.”n– F. Scott Fitzgerald

  43. Very interesting article about how some communities in California are regulating & controlling their dispensaries better than others.nhttp://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-weho-marijuana16-2009nov16,0,7678248,full.story

  44. I am all for it. The pharmaceutical companies are the real criminals and the way our health care system is going services like
    this would help local cancer patients.

  45. As we all know SB109 passed on Tuesday setting regulations for younger patients and doctors. Thursday in the state capital our senate committee will take public comment so please get out and exercise your free speech if you can on Thursday.

  46. So are all the people here against MJ legalization FOR alcohol criminalization?

    Alcohol is quite a bit worse than MJ if you dare to think about it…

  47. Weed stays in your system for at least a week or more. If there is one thing I am sure of, it is you can’t convince a Marihuana PRohibitionist that PRohibition is bad. That’s like trying to convince a slave owner to free his/her slaves. It takes a kind of person to be a Marihuana PRohibitionist. I am convinced of that.

  48. I think it is “mad” why the town refused. Must be into burning books (or at least ripping out pages)nnI bet Marihuana Prohibition history is “not” being taught in schools, good thing for the prohibitionists, because they would eventually be charged with “hate crimes”. Can someone here tell me the difference between Marihuana Prohibition, and other hate crimes? Anyone?????

  49. Weed stays in your system for at least a week or more. If there is one thing I am sure of, it is you can't convince a Marihuana PRohibitionist that PRohibition is bad. That's like trying to convince a slave owner to free his/her slaves. It takes a kind of person to be a Marihuana PRohibitionist. I am convinced of that.

  50. I think it is “mad” why the town refused. Must be into burning books (or at least ripping out pages)I bet Marihuana Prohibition history is “not” being taught in schools, good thing for the prohibitionists, because they would eventually be charged with “hate crimes”. Can someone here tell me the difference between Marihuana Prohibition, and other hate crimes? Anyone?????

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