Liquor and Wine Store Opening June 10th

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The sign is up and construction is nearly finished. The new contract state liquor store in Mountlake Terrace, located at 4402 224th Street SW (at the previous “Video Mirage” location, next to Sorrelli’s Pizza,) is scheduled to open on June 10th.


16 COMMENTS

  1. Nothing screams a city of alcoholics like the only retail store for blocks being a liquor store smack dab in the middle of of a residential neighborhood. Personally, I don’t think this the best choice of locations.

    • Mark I’m not a drinker let alone an alcoholic, however my opinion is the economy is improving and you should maybe meet the owners of the estabilishment before developing your opinion. I think you might be surprised to find out they have been living in the neighborhood for 25 years and there is a demand for alcohol wheather its inMLT or Lynnwood so say something positive it makes you a happier person … fyi your smile looks nice.

      • Pollybond… what does the economy, meeting owners of a retail store (as fine a people as they proably are), the demand for spirits or the fact that the aforementioned contract holders have been living here for 25 years have to do with the negative image this location for a liquor store has on our community? Nothing. I’m certainly NOT against alcohol… wine, spirits, beer… it’s all a good thing (in moderation). I most certainly have nothing against the proprietors, or the wares they are trading and I don’t think anything I stated in my very short post implied anything CLOSE to contradicting with previous statements. My one and ONLY complaint is the location. nnThe problem lies in the fact that it’s standing out there, bold and in broad exclamation that none of the residents in proximity need travel far for their libations. What’s wrong with putting the store in a more dense retail environment like 90%+ of all other liquor stores are (e.g. Ballinger, Lynnwood, North Lynnwood, Everett’s locations) All nestled into a shopping areas… not emblazoned in the middle of a residential area. Oh sure, some will argue retail space cost prevents contract liquor stores to afford that kind of space, but I agrue that there are MANY places that are better locations and equally affordable per square foot.nnBesides that, at this time, this type of store is EXTREMELY risky with I-1100 gaining serious momentum and support. I just don’t want to see yet another local business, with local proprietors fail.nnTo me, the location screams to an outsider that our community relies on this type of store, that its residents can’t travel the 1-2 miles to a shopping area to get their booze, their fruits, veggies and meats, but have to have the liquor close at hand. “Travel for food? Sure, but for our booze? Heck no! Gotta make sure I can get to it quickly at closing time to stock up before I fall over!”nnThat’s what it says to me… again, nothing about the economy, or the contract owner’s time in our community. Strictly location and the stigma this location will create for our community.nnWe have dive bars, we have crappy convenience stores and a liquor store in the middle of our residential community. A fitness place closed down, and bikini baristas at the edge of town. You CAN’T tell me that doesn’t represent a stereotype for a neighborhood… A saving grace for our community’s already faltering image is the QFC and the local ownership and revitalization of Sorelli Pizza into a nice place.nnLastly, I say plenty positive and support what I think is worth supporting, and am a VERY happy person. I just speak my mind, but tend to speak louder about things I disagree with.nnOh, and thanks (about the smile). 🙂

        • There are other great businesses as well on the other side of the greenbelt… I was only referring to the 44th side, so don’t jump me about the good businesses like Red Onion and Amorn Thai (among others…) 😉

        • They are on a contract with the state… there are 155 contract stores in the state of Washington, compared to 161 state run stores. Most often, contract stores are in smaller communities that cannot support a state run store, such as very small towns. There are very few in larger communities such as ours, as the state run store are more prevalant and can stock a much vaster selection and quantity than contract stores (as is evident in our local contract store). The contract stores average about $800,000 in annual sales, which equates to about $266,000 back to the state. Comparitively, the average state store brings in over $4 million in annual sales. This is obviously due to the buying power of the state for quantity and variety. A contract store benefits the state as they don’t have to run it, but they still control it. Yet, they don’t make nearly as much money (state stores return nearly $1.5 million average back to the state).I’m really surprised the state allowed this contract run store in this community, with better stocked stores (and higher revenue) a very short distance away. Having now been to our local store, I have to say I wasn’t impressed. While the team was very nice indeed, the clutter, the lack of selection, the professionalism of the store was a turn off. Something about kids playing in a liquor store and the cashier in a cheesy t-shirt, shorts and flip flops that’s just a turn-off to me. I’ll continue to visit the Ballinger or Lynnwood stores until I-1100 passes.nn(Figure source: 2009 WSLCB Annual Report)

  2. Nothing screams a city of alcoholics like the only retail store for blocks being a liquor store smack dab in the middle of of a residential neighborhood. Personally, I don't think this the best choice of locations.

  3. Mark I'm not a drinker let alone an alcoholic, however my opinion is the economy is improving and you should maybe meet the owners of the estabilishment before developing your opinion. I think you might be surprised to find out they have been living in the neighborhood for 25 years and there is a demand for alcohol wheather its inMLT or Lynnwood so say something positive it makes you a happier person … fyi your smile looks nice.

  4. Pollybond… what does the economy, meeting owners of a retail store (as fine a people as they proably are), the demand for spirits or the fact that the aforementioned contract holders have been living here for 25 years have to do with the negative image this location for a liquor store has on our community? Nothing. I'm certainly NOT against alcohol… wine, spirits, beer… it's all a good thing (in moderation). I most certainly have nothing against the proprietors, or the wares they are trading and I don't think anything I stated in my very short post implied anything CLOSE to contradicting with previous statements. My one and ONLY complaint is the location. The problem lies in the fact that it's standing out there, bold and in broad exclamation that none of the residents in proximity need travel far for their libations. What's wrong with putting the store in a more dense retail environment like 90%+ of all other liquor stores are (e.g. Ballinger, Lynnwood, North Lynnwood, Everett's locations) All nestled into a shopping areas… not emblazoned in the middle of a residential area. Oh sure, some will argue retail space cost prevents contract liquor stores to afford that kind of space, but I agrue that there are MANY places that are better locations and equally affordable per square foot.Besides that, at this time, this type of store is EXTREMELY risky with I-1100 gaining serious momentum and support. I just don't want to see yet another local business, with local proprietors fail.To me, the location screams to an outsider that our community relies on this type of store, that its residents can't travel the 1-2 miles to a shopping area to get their booze, their fruits, veggies and meats, but have to have the liquor close at hand. “Travel for food? Sure, but for our booze? Heck no! Gotta make sure I can get to it quickly at closing time to stock up before I fall over!”That's what it says to me… again, nothing about the economy, or the contract owner's time in our community. Strictly location and the stigma this location will create for our community.We have dive bars, we have crappy convenience stores and a liquor store in the middle of our residential community. A fitness place closed down, and bikini baristas at the edge of town. You CAN'T tell me that doesn't represent a stereotype for a neighborhood… A saving grace for our community's already faltering image is the QFC and the local ownership and revitalization of Sorelli Pizza into a nice place.Lastly, I say plenty positive and support what I think is worth supporting, and am a VERY happy person. I just speak my mind, but tend to speak louder about things I disagree with.Oh, and thanks (about the smile). 🙂

  5. There are other great businesses as well on the other side of the greenbelt… I was only referring to the 44th side, so don't jump me about the good businesses like Red Onion and Amorn Thai (among others…) 😉

  6. They are on a contract with the state… there are 155 contract stores in the state of Washington, compared to 161 state run stores. Most often, contract stores are in smaller communities that cannot support a state run store, such as very small towns. There are very few in larger communities such as ours, as the state run store are more prevalant and can stock a much vaster selection and quantity than contract stores (as is evident in our local contract store). The contract stores average about $800,000 in annual sales, which equates to about $266,000 back to the state. Comparitively, the average state store brings in over $4 million in annual sales. This is obviously due to the buying power of the state for quantity and variety. A contract store benefits the state as they don't have to run it, but they still control it. Yet, they don't make nearly as much money (state stores return nearly $1.5 million average back to the state).I'm really surprised the state allowed this contract run store in this community, with better stocked stores (and higher revenue) a very short distance away. Having now been to our local store, I have to say I wasn't impressed. While the team was very nice indeed, the clutter, the lack of selection, the professionalism of the store was a turn off. Something about kids playing in a liquor store and the cashier in a cheesy t-shirt, shorts and flip flops that's just a turn-off to me. I'll continue to visit the Ballinger or Lynnwood stores until I-1100 passes.(Figure source: 2009 WSLCB Annual Report)

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